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3D Zoetrope

Purely mechanical
 
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Take a Zoetrope and modify it so the axis (and the slits) are horizontal. Then use lenticular printing to create 3D images to replace the standard ones. The result: a purely mechanical 3D animated sequence.

I can't seem to find if anyone has done this before. A search for 3D Zoetrope finds a lot of devices with spinning 3D objects, but the animation is achieved using a strobe or camera rather than slits as in standard Zoetropes.

scad mientist, Dec 11 2013

Zoetrope http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoetrope
[scad mientist, Dec 12 2013]

Lenticular Printing http://en.wikipedia...Lenticular_printing
[scad mientist, Dec 12 2013]

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       Why not put little 3D models on each frame?
pocmloc, Dec 12 2013
  

       I'm prety sure the Studio Ghibli Museum in Tokyo has 3D Zoetropes but I can't be certain - it was a few years ago I saw them.
hippo, Dec 12 2013
  

       I read that the big Ghibli zoetrope uses flashing LEDs to achieve the effect. Did they sell slit based toy versions as well? Of course a strobe based one probably gives a much better effect, but I'm thinking of this as a cheap toy that doesn't require batteries.   

       While having 3D sculptures inside of a slit based zoetrope would probably work, it seems like a version using lenticular printing would seem more magical. When viewed from the side rather than through the slits, hopefully the angle would be far enough off that there would be very little 3D effect, and of course through the slits it's hard to see unless it is spinning. But once spinning, the depth of the image could theoretically extend toward the viewer farther than the axis of rotation and away from the viewer outside the boundaries of the zoetrope.   

       Also, it seems like lenicular printing might be cheaper than casting them out of plastic: a definite advantage in the toy catagory.
scad mientist, Dec 12 2013
  


 

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