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AA Isosceles Triangle

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In products that have moulded markings, which are basically invisible in most light unless I shine a sodding great video light at it, there are rectangles with a nearly indistinguishable little extra nib at one end, to indicate which way round the AA cells should go.

Replace this graphic — get rid of the rectangles altogether — use instead a long pointy isosceles triangle per cell, pointing at the positive end. That’s the way to do it.

Ian Tindale, Dec 17 2017

An earlier effort ... http://books.google...0of%20stuff&f=false
... to purge English of forrinitude [pertinax, Jan 04 2018]

The same thing ... http://books.google...m%20clarity&f=false
... but with Russian [pertinax, Jan 04 2018]

[link]






       // That’s the way to do it. //   

       <encouraging hand gestures to audience>   

       "Oh no it isn't ! "
8th of 7, Dec 17 2017
  

       Alternatively, the pointy triangle could indicate the direction of flow of electrons, which would be much more logical.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 17 2017
  

       But, for a distant civilisation on a planet in a far-off galaxy composed entirely of antimatter, they would want this standard to indicate the flow of positrons - you can't have one labelling standard which works for both customer groups.
hippo, Dec 17 2017
  

       Alternatively, the nib thing on the end of the AA cell is sometimes referred to as the nipple (well, by me, anyway). So perhaps a picture of a breast would indicate which direction the nipple faces. I didn’t select this option, because in most cases the AA cells face opposing directions, which would constitute an odd looking pair.
Ian Tindale, Dec 17 2017
  

       Also, on the topic of direction of flow of electrons, whilst this is technically true, it actually constitutes a current of vacating holes where electrons were, which will become filled by other electrons now that the holes are vacant. This “current” of holes becoming filled of course “flows” in the opposing direction to the actual electron motion “.”
Ian Tindale, Dec 17 2017
  

       Well, if you're going to indicate the direction of movement of things that aren't there, you'd need to use an isosceles triangle that wasn't there.   

       It might be easier to just use a mains adaptor, or not use the item in question.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 17 2017
  

       It should be possible to have batteries with internal circuitry such that they can reconfigure their -ve and +ve terminals dynamically so that it doesn't matter which way round you put them in.
hippo, Dec 17 2017
  

       Actually, it should be possible to redesign battery holders to accept existing batteries in either orientation.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 18 2017
  

       It's not only possible, it's been done. However...   

       The problem is if you're using arrays of single cells. If you have 1.5V primary cell, even the best Germanium Schottky diodes have a Vf of about 0.15V, meaning that - because the diodes are in a bridge - you're always losing at least 0.3V per cell. That's 20% ....   

       If you have a battery, then 0.3V off 9V or 12V is manageable.
8th of 7, Dec 18 2017
  

       (germanium schottky diodes -> .15v drop) I am incredulous that a semiconductor cannot do what a simple relay can do, use a brief pulse of current, once, to make a permanent circuit path.
beanangel, Dec 18 2017
  

       You can build a circuit round Ge diodes and a QPCO remanence relay, but you need one assembly per cell bay, adding bulk and mass.
8th of 7, Dec 18 2017
  

       (Ahem) hello? Printed or embossed triangle?
Ian Tindale, Dec 18 2017
  

       //But, for a distant civilisation on a planet in a far-off galaxy composed entirely of antimatter, they would want this standard to indicate the flow of positrons - you can't have one labelling standard which works for both customer groups.//   

       To be fair, it would be hard to make a single standard for batteries which would interface with both terrestrial equipment and consumer electronics from far-off galaxies composed entirely of antimatter.
A mis-insertion would cause an explosion equivalent to approx 650 kilotons of TNT [1], so it might be an idea to attach a suitable warning to imported equipment.
  

       [1] for a single AA lithium battery [2]. Alkaline or rechargables would cause larger explosions.[3]
[2] In either orientation.
[3] All assuming that the equipment is heavier than the battery.
Loris, Dec 18 2017
  

       //A mis-insertion would cause an explosion equivalent to approx 650 kilotons of TNT// - thanks, you're right - I forgot about that. A minor oversight
hippo, Dec 18 2017
  

       Surely the problem here is our insistence on using direct current?   

       Just make AC batteries, and then they can be fitted in either orientation.
Wrongfellow, Dec 18 2017
  

       Or even better still, static electricity cells.
Ian Tindale, Dec 18 2017
  

       // static electricity cells //   

       Sp. "Capacitor".   

       // A minor oversight //   

       Some sort of warning label might be appropriate, then.
8th of 7, Dec 18 2017
  

       Embossed is always cheaper unless you forget and have to add it to the plastic tool later.
RayfordSteele, Dec 18 2017
  

       //static electricity cells// - but static electricity wouldn't be any good for powering a device with moving parts
hippo, Dec 18 2017
  

       It’d be fine for small items such as pencils, tape dispensers, erasers, spiral-bound notepads, etc.
Ian Tindale, Dec 18 2017
  

       //It's not only possible, it's been done. However... //   

       You are over-thinking things. This can be done with an identical pair of contacts at each end of the battery compartment.   

       Each contact pair consists of a plastic "hat" whose body is plastic, but with the brim and the crown made of metal. Whichever way the battery is inserted, the "brim" at one end will connect with the negative base of the battery, whilst the "crown" at the other will connect with the positive nipple.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 18 2017
  

       Are you sure?
Ian Tindale, Dec 18 2017
  

       I'm always sure and often right.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 18 2017
  

       //I am incredulous that a semiconductor cannot do what a simple relay can do, use a brief pulse of current, once, to make a permanent circuit path.//   

       FETs can do the trick nicely. Very little voltage drop across a fraction of an ohm device. Chuck in a capacitor with the chip for a guaranteed 1.5v.
bigsleep, Dec 18 2017
  

       JFET or IGFET ?
8th of 7, Dec 18 2017
  

       //It’d be fine for small items such as pencils, tape dispensers, erasers, spiral-bound notepads, etc.// Indeed - ideal for those kinds of thing
hippo, Dec 18 2017
  

       As long as the cupboard they’re all kept in hasn’t been moved.
Ian Tindale, Dec 18 2017
  

       //JFET or IGFET ?//   

       IGFET or Base On Base Apart.
bigsleep, Dec 19 2017
  

       Ah yes, the infamous BOBA FET ...
8th of 7, Dec 19 2017
  

       Thus spake the misfet.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 19 2017
  

       ... Ande Theyre Wass Mutch Reyjoicinge ...
8th of 7, Dec 19 2017
  

       Nobody has ever spelled English that way.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 19 2017
  

       It's Anglo-Saxon, a purer, cleaner, less fattening language, entirely free of artificial preservatives, colours, flavours, and frenchness.
8th of 7, Dec 19 2017
  

       No it's not. It's cod Anglo-Saxon.   

       Youe cante jysste adde randome mysspellynges and clame it isse Angloe Saxonne. The Dutch have already tried something similar, but with more phlegm.
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 19 2017
  

       Eye thyncke yeu wylle fynde thatte yeu canne acktcheualleye.
pocmloc, Dec 22 2017
  

       //entirely free of [...] frenchness//   

       See links.
pertinax, Jan 04 2018
  
      
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