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Auto-adjusting rifling to counter-act the Coriolis effect, wind velocity and so on

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Whilst waiting for lunch in the soup kitchen I invented a way to make auto-adjusting rifling.

The device is a rifle barrel made of short tube sections, which can be independently rotated.

But that's not the clever bit, the clever bit is each tube section has many little rotatable section of rifling. At this point a diagram might be handy - see lovingly hand- drawn napkin wossername.

Combining this with a magnetic inclinometer means that the weapon automatically adjust the direction of rifling to overcome the Coriolis effect, no matter which hemisphere you are in, obviously the rifling needed at the equator is zero.

Equally on a windless day, you can go over to reduced power mode and turn the rifling off, and for left-handed shooters, it's the easy solution to a perennial problem.

//Update - finally got the original sketch to work

I rest my case. Ok,ok it was either this or Arthur Askey's contribution to coding of alphabets for the early computers at Bletchely Park. His original family name is "Ascii" a Finnish name with obscure origins, it was Anglicized to 'Askey' when his maternal grandfather immigrated in 1836. Like a lot of people on the Enigma project, he preferred not to talk about what he did there.

not_morrison_rm, Apr 16 2015

der sketch https://www.flickr....489@N03/16951738167
[not_morrison_rm, Apr 17 2015]

[link]






       I can well understand Mr. Askey's reticence. My maternal grandfather - the late Sir Filligree 'Phil' Buchanan-Buchanan - would never speak about what he did in the war, however much we pressed him. After he died we discovered that this was because he'd done bugger all.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 16 2015
  

       Yes, but that did make him unsurprisingly popular with his shipmates ...
8th of 7, Apr 17 2015
  

       Key question: Does changing rifling actually have any effect on bullet response to wind, Coriolis, etc?
MechE, Apr 17 2015
  

       Oh, the old "Does this idea actually work as advertised?" question.   

       I'll wager no. Compensating for the spin of the earth by adjusting the spin of the projectile seems unlikely.
normzone, Apr 17 2015
  

       I can't see any problem with having many small moving parts on the inside of a gun barrel, so [+].
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 17 2015
  

       //Key question: Does changing rifling actually have any effect on bullet response to wind, Coriolis, etc?   

       Well, I did consider the option of just a reversible barrel, in front of the chamber, so worse comes the worst it can be unscrewed and put on the other way around. But that's so jejune.   

       //I can't see any problem with having many small moving parts on the inside of a gun barrel,   

       See, added shotgun effect, at no additional charge.   

       Personally I'm wondering if with enough spin, could you make the bullet rebound from objects sufficiently well enough to make them go round corners? A la mini bouncing bomb..
not_morrison_rm, Apr 19 2015
  

       // it can be unscrewed and put on the other way around. //   

       ... which will make no difference whatsoever.   

       Think about it; rifling is is either right or left-hand twist. Reversing it end-over-end makes no difference.
8th of 7, Apr 19 2015
  

       Hmm... wonder if loading the cartridge with a SF6 buffer would have any effect: powder explodes, heating the SF6 which stays at the back of the bullet as a sabot, keeping the smaller molecules from running out between the bullet and barrel.
FlyingToaster, Apr 19 2015
  

       The turbulence is tremendous, the SF6 would be completely mixed with the propellant gases. There is an existing and rather clever bit of technology called a "wad" which improves the seal quite well, but the whole point of the forcing cone just ahead of the chamber is to swage the projectile into intimate contact with the rifling. With jacketed rounds, there's not much blow-by.   

       Even on artillery shells, the driving band manages a pretty good metal-to-metal seal.
8th of 7, Apr 19 2015
  

       //Reversing it end-over-end makes no difference   

       Aha, you're just trying to get me to look down a lot of gun barrels . Is it something I said? Triggers incursion into Borg territory...   

       // the driving band   

       Sounds like a marching band, but on wheels? I can imagine Scottish regiments deploying Nissan pick-ups as tacticals with twin .50 cal b******s, but I would prefer not to.
not_morrison_rm, Apr 19 2015
  

       // Aha, you're just trying to get me to look down a lot of gun barrels //   

       One would be enough. We'd have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for those pesky kids ...   

       // Scottish regiments deploying Nissan pick-ups as tacticals //   

       ... and the slipstream would cause the kilts to swirl up ... the horror, the horror ...
8th of 7, Apr 19 2015
  
      
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