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Call Frequency Sorted Phonebook

To reach the most (or least) called/ calling people in the book
  (+8, -6)
(+8, -6)
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Why not call the people who seem to think that using the phone is important, and don't bother calling people who don't use the phone frequently? The frequent callers/ callees are probably the people who react best on beeing called, right?

My experience is that some people like (depend) on using the phone do get things done. Some people are very important, so they get many phonecalls (this might be even enhanced through good replies).

You could also attach other conclusions on beeing called frequently, or calling frequently. For example for companies: bad service, bad product, good service, good network (of people), or for people ((a)social, good network, stalker. ;-)

psneekes, Jul 11 2002


po, Jul 11 2002

       Can't wait to see your next idea.
reensure, Jul 11 2002

       As far as I can tell, my cell phone does that (at least, I can't identify any other rationale for the way it sorts my address book entries) (though, of course, I only have the people I call most frequently in my cell phone address book in the first place).
DrCurry, Jul 11 2002

       I think it'd be great, but it also might let my girlfriend figure out I was cheating on her when she sees that she is second in the sort order.
hexadecimal, Jul 11 2002

       Some important people have unlisted numbers so idiots/ stalkers can't reach them. Also, I question whether you can attribute the quality of a company to the number of calls received.
polartomato, Jul 11 2002

       Generally when I use a phone book (whether the published kind or the built-in directory on a cell phone) I'm looking for a certain person or business. With an alphabetical phone book, I can fairly easily find Mary Jones by searching for names starting wth "J", then "Jo", etc. If the book was sorted by popularity, I would have to guess how popular Mary Jones was in order to find her in the book. Really not very practical.
supercat, Jul 12 2002

       Generally when *I* use a cell phone book, it's to call my wife, my voicemail, or one of a small number of others... This feature would ba a nice _addition_ to the sorting options on a cell phonebook.   

       I'd also like to see the same thing for email address books: sort by most-frequent senders, recipients, repliers, those to whom I've replied, etc.   

       Keep up the good work, and don't let the nay-sayers get you down.
land, Jul 12 2002

       Nay sayeth I.   

       Is the listing based on number of calls made, received, or both? Can I be unlisted? Does anyone else suspect the local pizza joint will always be listed first.
phoenix, Jul 12 2002

       //Generally when *I* use a cell phone book, it's to call my wife, my voicemail, or one of a small number of others... This feature would ba a nice _addition_ to the sorting options on a cell phonebook.//   

       While standard last-name alphabetical order is not the only possible sequence, automatic sequencing whose effects are not logical and predictable is apt to be more of a nuisance than anything else.   

       To be sure, having a short history-list and the means to call up items on it is useful. On the other hand, I can't imagine most people, upon deciding to call Aunt Martha, are apt to remember that she's the 74th-most-recent person called. A list of the 10-20 or so most-recently-used numbers/addresses may be useful if someone can quickly look to see if the person they want is there and, if not, find it via conventional means. Searching through a 100-item history list to find what happens to be the 74th-most-rcent caller, however, would be a waste of time.
supercat, Jul 13 2002


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