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CookieCone

Fresh, hot cookie ice cream cones.
  (+4)
(+4)
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I know cookie ice cream cones are baked (ha!). But the availability of fresh, hot, chocolate chip cookie cones is limited enough that I've never seen them. My idea is for a cone shaped metal device, coated with Teflon. This metal cone will rest on a rotating base. The base rotates through steam expansion - water is placed in the base before baking.

Cookie dough is rolled and formed into a cone shape, then placed into this device. The device is placed in the oven, and begins to spin. As the cookie dough softens from the heat it resists sliding down to the base of the cone because of centripetal force that comes from spinning. The result? Fresh baked cookie cones.

Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003

Cone Maker http://www.cooking....odde.asp?SKU=185779
Waffelicious [Letsbuildafort]

Inspiration http://www.halfbake...ugh_20in_20a_20cone [Letsbuildafort, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

Inspiration http://www.halfbake...ugh_20in_20a_20cone
[Worldgineer, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 05 2004]

Cookie Test 1 http://www.geocitie.../HB/CookieTest.html
[Worldgineer, Oct 04 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

[link]






       I'da thunk that an inner and outer metal cone might have been an easier solution for baking these.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       Sure, if you're fine with two cookie-bottom textured surfaces.
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       That's better than a two-cookie textured bottom, I guess.
k_sra, Nov 19 2003
  

       They have chocolate chip waffle cones out there ...
Letsbuildafort, Nov 19 2003
  

       Well, I would be fine with that texture. But, if you insist on it looking like a cookie top, then bake the cookie in the appropriate shape and roll it before it cools like they do when they make waffle cones. Make sure to roll with the lumpy side out.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       I thought about that method, but have you ever tried to bend a warm cookie? Nothing but crumbs.
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       Ever tried to eat a really hot chocolate chip cookie? They are quite pliable. No real problem there. Unless you overcook them. In which case, use an "Air bake" aluminum cookie sheet. They make excellent cookies.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       [half] Ever tried to flip over a really hot cookie and then roll it into a cone? You get two cookie bottom textures. (well, ok, so I've never tried either - it's an assumption)
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       Most warm cookies are easily bent, but not very pliable since they don’t have a lot of tensile strength.
AO, Nov 19 2003
  

       I don't think that's the case. Rolling it might smooth out some of the lumps, but it wouldn't create the voids that are trapped during the baking process in the bottom of the cookie. But, no, I've never tried rolling it. I was envisioning just laying it on an inverted cone shape when the appropriately shaped cookie is just the right temperature.   

       By pliable I mean easily bent. Are you trying to stretch the cookie, or smash it thinner or something? I would tend to use the word ductile for that, though I guess they're actually synonyms. I was envisioning the cookie being baked in the proper two-dimensional geometric shape to begin with. An unrolled cone (if made from sheet metal, paper, whatever) doesn't generally look like your typical cookie.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       Something that’s pliable does not break when you bend it. If you bend a warm cookie to much it will break, which would make it especially difficult to form the pointy end of the cone.
AO, Nov 19 2003
  

       Heh. Okay, they facilitate the baking of cookies with qualites that I find superior to those baked on a traditional non-insulated cookie sheet or jelly roll pan.   

       In my experience, a fresh-from-the-oven chocolate chip cookie is quite pliable. I'll check the limits next time I bake some.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       // laying it on an inverted cone shape // I'm just not seeing it, without severely burning my fingers.
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       Sheesh, I eat them when they're that hot. Don't make me go home and bake cookies...   

       Silicone gloves maybe?
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       I think it's time for a group assignment. Everyone go home tonight and test the integrity of your favorite recipe cookies - handle them while they are as hot as you can stand*. Report back here with results.   

       * Worldgineer and Boondoggle Inc. accept no liability for any injuries incurred during the handling of hot cookies. Please use adult supervision.
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       Ooh, adult supervision. Well, I may have to bail out then. I'm not sure that my wife will have time to help.
half, Nov 19 2003
  

       Certainly you can find someone to watch you bake cookies. They are cookies, after all, and perhaps ice cream cones if you are correct.
Worldgineer, Nov 19 2003
  

       You don't need to go back and forth like this, humans. How 'bout the solution which entails cookie dough in a cookie cone? Then any humans still not satiated can all go out for ice cream. Eat up. I'll put that one in my book. +
sartep, Nov 19 2003
  

       Ok, my cookie test is complete. I like the recipe on the back of chocolate chips, using one less cube of butter (otherwise too greasy for my taste). One cookie I have made larger and thinner than the other cookies. Directly out of the oven it did not have the strength to hold up to even a moderate bend (a coffee cup was used for the bend). I admit the recipe makes thick cookies.   

       I await everyone else's test results. Please mail samples to...
Worldgineer, Nov 20 2003
  

       [World] Do you think gingerbread would work better? If not that, then a fortune cookie recipe would certainly do the trick (but I don’t know if you fold fortune cookies before or after you cook them.)
AO, Nov 20 2003
  

       [UB] Thanks for the recipes. Are you saying I should give up and go back to waffle cones?   

       [AO] I'm not sure about gingerbread. Every kind I've made has been somewhat cookie-like and wouldn't bend like this. Fortune cookies would definately work, but are a little bit far away from what I'm looking for.   

       (everyone) So what happened? I give you one little assignment and I'm the only one that follows through? It's making cookies - there's a reward built in to the task.
Worldgineer, Nov 20 2003
  

       When I worked in an icecream store, we had a conical piece of wood with a handle, for shaping the cones, and used cotton gloves so our fingers didn't burn. I can do it in my sleep, and indeed, do still have dreams about it. A swift slap will wrench me from one such, whereupon I look down to see my own hands plying some appendage belonging to my partner, or possibly the cat...
Detly, Nov 20 2003
  

       One of the best smells I have ever experienced: a little ice cream shop on Capri making fresh waffle cones (wipes drool off keyboard).
Worldgineer, Jun 26 2004
  

       Thanks Detly.
subflower, Aug 09 2005
  

       I presume you're [Detley]'s cat? Welcome.
Worldgineer, Aug 09 2005
  
      
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