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Daterape swizzlestick

Date-rape drink stirrer
 
(0)
  [vote for,
against]

There is already a similar product on the market. It's a coaster that tests drinks for date-rape drugs. But who's going to dip the corner of her coaster in a drink that her date (or bartender) brings her?

Using a stirrer guarantees safety for all. "Hey! why's this swizzle stick gone blue?"

The trick is making sure the sticks, stirrers, parasols, etc. can't be easily altered or forged (e.g. by peeing on them)

FloridaManatee, Dec 29 2002

Date Safe http://www.drinksafetech.com/products.php
the manufacturer [FloridaManatee, Oct 17 2004]

(?) ABC News http://abcnews.go.c...etection021006.html
News report on the coasters [FloridaManatee, Oct 17 2004]

BBC News again today http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3918379.stm
[angel, Oct 17 2004]

[link]






       "But who's going to dip the corner of her coaster in a drink that her date (or bartender) brings her?"   

       I would, for one, if I thought that there was a reason to be concerned.   

       The drink coaster is well suited because it is typically made of an absorbent material; an absorbancy needed for the test itself. Stirrers, on the other hand, are usually fluid resistant and, as such, are harder to make one that isn't obviously a test strip. The more discernable the test the more likely a woman might not use it for fear she will offend her date.   

       Of course, sticking the coaster in the drink isn't exactly discreet either.   

       Maybe if the entire inside surface of the glass is reactive?   

       In any case, +
bristolz, Dec 29 2002
  

       I don’t know what the drugs are, or how to test for them, but maybe it's possible to ‘paint’ a tester on the tip of your finger or fingernail beforehand? Then you could test inconspicuously. Just a thought.
Shz, Dec 29 2002
  

       Yeah, but by *who*?
thumbwax, Dec 30 2002
  

       The idea name is somewhat misleading (perhaps you could swap in the summary?) but a brilliant idea, regardless. +
cswiii, Dec 30 2002
  

       Regardless of whether it is currently possible to detect roofies or GHB in a drink, I think this idea differs a fair amount from any coaster; Most of the articles on the net reference the fact that, as drinks are often coloured already, it is difficult to discern whether or not there is any real colour "change".   

       However, a plastic drink stirrer seemingly would be less succeptible to this sort of change. If the plastic itself changed colour due to a chemical reaction with the illicit substance, though, it might be quite telling.
cswiii, Dec 31 2002
  

       Maybe an electronic stir stick with lights and a wee siren?
bristolz, Dec 31 2002
  

       I like the siren idea.   

       Actually, I have a better idea. It's a drug that you take before you go to the bar. It reacts to the GHB or Rohypnol in your bloodstream and makes your face go red and swell up like a pumpkin.   

       Motive removed; problem solved.   

       Actually, I once knew a girl who could get sh*tfaced on Cherryade. Two cherryades and she was anybody's. At least that's her story.
FloridaManatee, Dec 31 2002
  

       I don't mean to sound insensitive to the problem, but these stories never put any hard stats on these spiked drinks. I'm sure it does happen, but does it happen enough to warrant carrying a chem lab around with you? As someone who used to go clubbing frequently, I know a few girls who cried wolf when they overdid it a bit on K and/or G.

Still a good idea, I'm just a tad skeptical of all the fear based marketing (especially since 9/11).
latka, May 23 2003
  

       The old "roofies" have to be obtained otside the country now anyway. The american manufacturers changed the formulation to be insoluble in water. Not saying it can't happen but the instance went sharply down when this ocurred.
STUpidIDIOT, Jul 23 2004
  

       According to Derbyshire Detective Chief Superintendent Dave Gee, ""To my knowledge, and having consulted the Forensic Science Service on this, there is no single definitive test which can identify specific drugs in drinks or bodily fluids. It is a far more complicated issue than many people realise." (linky for more details.)
angel, Jul 23 2004
  

       Statistics or no, I hear about this happening at my university at least once a year, and thats far too often. If this can work, its a fantastic way to discreetly test. +
evilmathgenius, Jul 23 2004
  
      
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