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Dust Engine

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An engine that is powered by dust. Ideal for being the central rotational drive power of, for example, a fan or vacuum cleaner, anything that is expected to get dustier than everything else around it.

It works by brownian motion multiplication, whereby each dust particle's orientation is used as a pseudo-quantum difference engine part, like a reverse-entropy sortouter, coupled to rotation.

The dust particles, having done their job as a difference expression, can be atomised into molecules or microbes or whatever those small things are called, and put back together in reactive ways to form a constant level of reaction energy, directed westward. The resultant atom-smashed dusts will by then consist of nothing but their residual left-over zero energy remnants, and spat out as nothing.

Ian Tindale, Oct 21 2016

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       I can see no technical problems with this whatsoeveratall. In fact, now you've explained it so clearly, it's just surprising nobody has thought of it before.   

       Howevertheless, in the unlikely event that it doesn't work, how about using the dust as straightforward combustion fuel? Early attempts were made to make an internal combustion engine that ran on coal dust - I'm sure household dust must have a reasonable energy density.
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 21 2016
  

       // reverse-entropy //   

       I'm reporting you to the physics police.
Voice, Oct 21 2016
  

       "Thermodynamics: it's not just common sense, it's the LAW."
8th of 7, Oct 21 2016
  

       Look, let's get one thing straight. There, that's better. Also, just by merely calling it entropy, makes it slightly more ordered and tidy and labelled than before, so it'll then be less entropic.
Ian Tindale, Oct 21 2016
  

       What about enthalpy ? Doesn't that get a look-in ? What sort of pre-judging insensetive racist bigot are you ? You're worse than Hitler, you are. Just an evil prejudiced fascist. Oh sorry, are we keeping you from going out and stamping on puppies ? Go on then, don't let us delay you ...
8th of 7, Oct 21 2016
  

       When they start putting an enthalpy rating on packets of biscuits, then it'll be worth according credence.
Ian Tindale, Oct 21 2016
  

       This caused another dust powered engine idea: sand dunes take lots of low frequency sound, as wind motion of particles, then makes huge heaps, then when the huge heaps collapse they make high frequency sound. high frequency from cumulative low frequency, then engineer this to produce new energy machines
beanangel, Oct 21 2016
  

       Will they make Spice, too ?   

       What about the sandworms ?
8th of 7, Oct 21 2016
  

       Wasn't this the power source of the Total Perspective Vortex?
whatrock, Oct 21 2016
  

       What if you burn the dust?
caspian, Oct 22 2016
  

       That will depend on the constituents.   

       Dust can be organic, inorganic, or a mixture. It can be fine or coarse.   

       Some dusts - metals, coal or carbon, sugar, flour etc. are potentially explosive.   

       Others, based on silica or alumina, won't burn, but are highly abrasive.   

       Just calling it "dust" is of limited value - you need to know what's in it, and the particle sizes.
8th of 7, Oct 22 2016
  

       If photons were shined through this engine, the patterns would be very pretty.
wjt, Oct 26 2016
  

       Household dust is mostly made of dead human skin. So the in-home version could be called a skin engine or "skingine".
the porpoise, Oct 26 2016
  

       " The spice must flow ... "
normzone, Oct 26 2016
  

       Is this slightly Frank Herbetesque?
wjt, Oct 28 2016
  
      
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