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Merry Go Round Storefronts

Sharing a storefont with say four other businesses
 
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Some businesses don't really have to be open all day long. Put four of those businesses on a slowly turning or intermittent moving merry go round inside a strip mall storefront.

Each business is open for a quarter of the day. And they only have to come up with a quarter of the rent. example: Donuts and newspapers in the early morning. Insurance late morning. Clothing or vacuum repairs early afternoon. Pocket barroom til midnight.

Be good for those who have started a business in their homes and are making the transition. Business that repair for hours after making some sales in minutes.

Businesses with a lot of inventory or need to be open 24/7 wouldn't bother, but many little ones might take a chance.

(Yes Bing and Sinatra did a movie where the bar / dance hall turns into a church, but you and the police can stand on the sidewalk and watch these stores switch fronts. "Sit down your rocking the boat, Sir" )

popbottle, Jul 22 2014

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       I'm not sure about how much you actually save with the merry-go-round, but a well designed strip mall with the right mix of businesses could share parking lot space very efficiently.
scad mientist, Jul 22 2014
  

       My first annotation was based on the assumption that generally, total space is more of an issue than storefront width.   

       It seems like the places where storefront area is a limiting factor compared to total space is an area with multi-story buildings. So if you build this as a Ferris wheel instead of a merry-go-round, each store gets ground floor storefront during their prime time while taking advantage of vertical space. A set of stairs or an elevator could allow the store to still accept customers, just less conveniently, when the store wasn't at ground level. Hmm, a restaurant might do well to be at ground level for the lunch crowd, but have a nice view from the top of the building in the evening.
scad mientist, Jul 22 2014
  
      
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