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Orbital burial

For seriously devoted graverobbers.
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Cryogenic preservation of humans is a neat idea, but it has one big flaw: the need for constant power. One little blackout, and your beloved starts to thaw. Let's preserve people somewhere inherently cold, where they can rest undisturbed for millenia. A long orbit around the sun sounds about right.

Once deceased, a body is sealed in a metal coffin, and frozen to prevent decay before launch. The rocket's liquid oxygen (if present) may be used as a coolant. The rocket is then launched.

Once the proper attitude is attained, the coffin is released to drift in the void until sufficiently advanced technology is able to revive the being within. A space blanket shields the unit from solar radiation, while a heat pipe on the dark side radiates accumulated energy. A small solar powered radio beacon aids in recovery, and provides gentle comfort to those mourning a loss.

Aq_Bi, Apr 04 2015

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       // Once deceased //   

       Is that absolutely necessary ? There are numerous individuals on your planet who could beneficially dunked into liquid oxygen and launched into a remote orbit, without waiting for their demise ...
8th of 7, Apr 04 2015
  

       "Extraterrestrial transmission intercepted and translated, sir. It seems the sentient entities think the Earth is food supply resource and is giving out free samples"
wjt, Apr 04 2015
  

       I think you got a winner here. But then there isn't a lot of competition for preserving dead bodies.
blissmiss, Apr 04 2015
  
      
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