Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Piano Forké

Musical calibrations inscribed on products
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Everything makes a noise when struck with something else. The idea is to print unto certain products the exact note that they will create when suspended and tapped with a small percussion hammer.

Collect, assemble and learn to play your own musical instrument, courtesy of the domestic products that surround you.

xenzag, Mar 06 2006


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Annotation:







       I don't know if you get a "note" when striking a croissant with a hammer, but you're welcome to try on this one ((
phundug, Mar 06 2006
  

       Is the glass A# or Bb?
egbert, Mar 06 2006
  

       <pedant> Except in a small subset of musical systems, A# and Bb are different pitche(r)s. </pedant>
spidermother, Mar 07 2006
  

       A# and Bb are only different on paper.
Jscotty, Mar 07 2006
  

       OK, if we're going to get pedantic, despite what my parents used to maintain, a musical instrument is more than something that just makes a noise.   

       Having said that, I used to know someone who was so musical he could have got a tune out of a dead fish.
egbert, Mar 07 2006
  

       [Jscotty]//A# and Bb are only different on paper// Only in 12-equal temperament and some other compromised tunings. You're living in the 20th century, man!   

       [xenzag] I like the phrase //print unto//.
spidermother, Mar 07 2006
  

       Forger's motto: "Print unto Caesar"
egbert, Mar 07 2006
  

       I don't hear a note when I hit this sponge.
xandram, Mar 07 2006
  

       //where did B# and E# go anyway ?//   

       I started to answer this, but my annotation was becoming an essay (is Vernon a verb yet ;-)). B# and E# are useful names in certain (rare) contexts, but are omitted from the simplified theory taught at school. The distinction between, eg, B# and C relates to the musical context - what function the note has relative to other notes. In some systems B# is the same pitch as C, but in others it isn't.   

       If I get that essay finished, I'll post a link to it.
spidermother, Mar 07 2006
  

       egbert - what is your (parent's) definition of a musical instrument? - just curious. I like the idea of playing a dead fish - a thousand fish puns then follow, oh no not again!! ( see fishy fishnets for them all, before putting any more up)
xenzag, Mar 07 2006
  

       Their opinion was that the ones I listened to were a Bb##### noise.
egbert, Mar 07 2006
  

       Can a pin drop in d minor?
skinflaps, Mar 08 2006
  

       only if it produces at least 2 notes.
bleh, May 31 2006
  

       //I don't hear a note when I hit this sponge// B splat
mouseposture, Jan 15 2010
  


 

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