Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Rewards Card for pubs

Why not have a phone card system for pubs
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A "Pub" or "Beer" card could be topped up at any pub or supermarket thereby eliminating the problem of handing over change, or signing a reciept. You simply hand over your card, and assumming you have adequate credit left, you get beer back. This could also result in a reward scheme, say 1 pint for every 50 purchase, or a free packet of cheese and onion crisps with every 10 pints. As for the pub, they don't have to keep money on the premises, and can easily keep track on their most regular customers, and their drinking habits.
bobsta, Sep 18 2001

The Same Idea, but Broader http://www.clarityc...uttings-time-ns.htm
This idea has already been deployed. [Aristotle, Sep 18 2001]

[link]






       This idea is already out there in the market (see link) and has actually been used in some chains in Northern England. I know this as there a contraversy about the level at which a free beer was offered.
Aristotle, Sep 18 2001
  

       There are two ideas here, a rechargeable credit/debit card and a loyalty card. The first part would need to be run by an independent operator who would want to take a cut. The second part is baked in, among others, the Globe Ale House in Penzance, where the RATS (Real Ale Tasting Society) and OWLS (Only Wanting Lager Society) get 10% discount on Tuesday lunchtime and Thursday evening. Membership costs £8, and you get a T-shirt thrown in.
angel, Sep 18 2001
  

       That's a pretty decent discount, angel but what about the GUTS (Guinness Unified Tasters Society)?
DrBob, Sep 18 2001
  

       You too DrBob? Hurrah, I was told that it was only women and firemen who drank Guinness. Are you a fireman? I think this idea is great and seeing as it hasn't got to the Midlands yet I give it a croissant.
Miss Weston Smith, Sep 18 2001
  

       Barclay's on the Oakland - Berkeley boarder boasts t his arrangement already. Not the cashless part, but the "drink your way into a reward" program. As does Prince Of Wales in San Mateo.   

       T-shirts could say "I lost my driver's license but got this cool shirt"   

       pack o' crisps for this idea.
daruma, Sep 18 2001
  

       The closest I've seen to the "drink more beer to get more beer" promotion thing, is getting caps and tee-shirts, never more beer and never on a magnetic card system. I feel sorry for you yanks, only 3.2%, here in Blighty our tap water has a higher alcohol content (it has a higher content of many other nasty things too !)
bobsta, Sep 19 2001
  

       I took Heineken Dark to a Graduation party when I was 17, I arrived - and as expected - there was a beer truck - (this was 1977 - lax everything then) which was providing Light beer - 3.2 to best of my knowledge...

I was mocked by a couple of people early on - "What's that shit you got there, thumbwax?"
'This is Heineken Dark - it has flavor - it's not a pussy beer - and it doesn't taste like cat piss'
"HarHar - how do you know what cat piss tastes like? HarHar"

'Ask him' - as I pointed towards a goof holding a 3.2 beer cup and spewing cat piss into a nearby trash can.
thumbwax, Sep 19 2001
  

       I'll have one. I'll wear the t-shirt and everything. Me and Miss Weston Smith can terrorise the Midlands demanding our tenth pint free. (and twentieth).
lewisgirl, Sep 19 2001
  

       In UK, any 'beer' with an original gravity (ie, specific gravity before fermentation) of less than 1.03 - which would typically produce a beer of 3% alcohol - attracts the base level of excise duty. Higher gravities attract proportionally more duty. As the duty is by far the highest cost involved, there's no advantage to producing beer at less than 1.03. A 'soft drink' with less than 2% alcohol, such as pre-mixed shandy, may legally be sold to persons under 18 (which is the minimum drinking age in UK).
angel, Sep 19 2001
  
      
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