Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Squanto* and the Beanstalk

Fill the space in disposable diapers with plant seeds.
  (+2, -3)
(+2, -3)
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Just like the early settlers arriving aboard the Mayflower, average parents today don't know what to do about the environment they're given, so they buy and use whatever is easier for them at the time. This convenience produces waste, which costs us all in terms of pollutants and expensive disposal. Disposable diapers constitute a significant share of the biomass dumped into landfills, but why does this occur when poo sacks are valuable sources of plant nutrients?

We might be better off if we'd imagine our way back to the 1960s, when littering wasn't a second-degree felony and mobile parents simply pitched the tot's smelly butt bags out of the car and to the roadside. The difference is, that the diapers contain many, if not hundreds, seeds of flowering or ecologically adaptable plants. The waste and moisture inside the padding of each diaper would be a mini-incubator for outdoor propagation of plants with high nutrient reqirements. This is merely one stratagy in a global plan to decentrallize the inflows of baby bung and thereby stepple the landscape with oases of new growth.

*A quick historical note, Squanto was a legendary native American who taught the Mayflower passengers to plant corn, also to encourage better yield by adding fertilizer in the form of a decaying fish in each hillock.

reensure, Dec 10 2001

Eschew disposable diapers http://www.mother-ease.com/infoA.html
Here's why. [angel, Dec 10 2001]

(?) Why not human waste? http://www.healthre...les/fertilizer2.htm
It's been prohibited on crops for year in the US; but, babies aren't as contaminated as humans. [reensure, Dec 10 2001]

(?) Seeding via livestock http://grazel.taran...graze/seedlive.html
An interesting subject. [m-f-d] :-) [reensure, Dec 10 2001]

(?) The SNL skit I referred to... http://snltranscrip...s/91bearthies.phtml
...in my now-deleted annotation. Only took me a six months to turn it up. [phoenix, May 02 2002]

[link]






       A nice idea, if done well. Screw it up, and kids across the nation develop Chia tushies ...
1percent, Dec 10 2001
  

       Chicken shit is fed to cattle. Why not human shit? (I would post a reference, but you'd be too grossed out and wouldn't thank me.)
pottedstu, Dec 10 2001
  

       ¯phoenix: SNL? Get out of here!
reensure, Dec 10 2001
  

       'Babies aren't as contaminated as humans'? From my link: 'Human feces can contain harmful pathogens (for example, babies who have been vaccinated for polio will excrete poliovirus).'
angel, Dec 10 2001
  

       Sure, it's a fine fertiliser, and when adequately composted it's perfectly safe, but when freshly excreted it most certainly is not.
angel, Dec 10 2001
  

       Squanto was talking about fish, not this stuff, and the fish were buried underground. What happens if this dries out and the dust blows around... and rehydrates on different surfaces, eg. homes or cars? Ewww
spew, Dec 10 2001
  

       From the "Why not human waste" link:   

       "Having prions in your brain also makes a person more open to suggestions that may be encoded through the transmission of TV and radio waves."   

       Uh oh... better get out my tin foil hat...
PotatoStew, Dec 10 2001
  

       Babies aren't human? I must take issue with that.
snarfyguy, Dec 11 2001
  

       No, it sounds OK to me.
angel, Dec 11 2001
  
      
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