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Subtitle justification committee

Show some respect
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When a speaker of a foreign language is shown on TV, the options are either a voice-over or subtitles.

But on many occasions, a foreigner is speaking English. Accented English, certainly. Imperfect English, quite possibly. But - and this is the important thing - perfectly comprehensible English.

Yet there are many instances of such speech being gratuitously and unnecessarily subtitled. This shows a marked lack of respect to the speaker, who is doing the Right Thing by learning and speaking English. Many foreigners are justifiably proud if their English skills, and are to be applauded for their efforts - particularly considering the handicap they have, i.e. they aren't English.

Now, it is notable that many of the programmes having this feature are intended for the american market, where it's known that the inhabitants don't speak the language very well. But this is their problem.

What is required is a panel of native English speakers from different regions who have normal hearing. When a broadcaster wishes to overlay subtitles on a segment where English is being spoken, they must submit it to the panel. If 75% or more of the panel get 75% or better of the meaning, then permission for subtitles would be refused.

8th of 7, Jun 20 2017


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Annotation:







       Well at least this isn't in other: [general]
hippo, Jun 20 2017
  

       //Many foreigners are justifiably proud if their English skills// As are many natives.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 20 2017
  

       Incidentally, those of us who were around in the 1970s can remember when the BBC always used to subtitle Americans so that people could make sense of what they were saying.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 20 2017
  

       No, wait - that was Argentinians.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 20 2017
  

       What's the difference ? What sort of foreign do they use in argentinia for their weird gibberings ?
8th of 7, Jun 20 2017
  

       Probably the same as in Argentina.   

       We in the states find it fascinating that you Brits can have so many incomprehensible dialects of one language on one tiny little archipelago, while we here in the Midwest literally define the universal lingua. So much so that newscasters from everywhere come here to learn how to speak. Do you simply not travel enough to blend the language? I realize that most parts of the countryside look exactly the same in the fog, but seeing the other side of island every once in awhile will do you some good.
RayfordSteele, Jun 20 2017
  

       Dubbing always sounds so fake. Gotta be a way to improve that.
theircompetitor, Jun 20 2017
  

       // We in the states find it fascinating that you Brits can have so many incomprehensible dialects of one language on one tiny little archipelago, //   

       Ah yes, the Isle of Wight accent is exceptionally dense.   

       // while we here in the Midwest literally define the universal lingua. //   

       Midwest ? You mean Wiltshire ?   

       // So much so that newscasters from everywhere come here to learn how to speak.   

       Yes, we are aware that the majority of trainee newscasters, particularly those from south of the Manson-Nixon line, are deficient in linguistic skills, communicating largely by hand gestures and incoherent grunts. Those that eventually succeed in acquiring spoken language go on to careers in the media; the failures end up working as White House staffers under Democratic administrations.   

       // Do you simply not travel enough to blend the language? //   

       No, because it's much easier to have an irrational instant prejudice against someone who's identifiable as a stranger because they have a slightly different accent.   

       "Blend" = "pollute", "adulterate", "dilute".   

       // I realize that most parts of the countryside look exactly the same in the fog, //   

       ... and indeed when it's not foggy.   

       // but seeing the other side of island every once in awhile will do you some good. //   

       Went there once, it was awful. The water tasted funny, the beer was different, they all spoke strangely, and they lacked a sense of humour. Never again.
8th of 7, Jun 20 2017
  

       While we're all bathed in a nice xenophobic glow, can I say something about the voice-overs on American documentaries? I mean, seriously, how do you watch those things? They can be about the search for the Higgs boson, the first world war, kidney transplants or mesolithic art, but they always sound like an infomercial for statins.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jun 20 2017
  

       "Ask your physician if painting on cave walls with a stick dipped in wet clay is right for you ..."   

       // bathed in a nice xenophobic glow //   

       <inserts toasting fork into pikelet, offers to heat source>
8th of 7, Jun 20 2017
  

       //"Ask your physician if painting on cave walls with a stick dipped in wet clay is right for you ..."//   

       And if they say "no", find a different doctor, after all the patient* is always right**.   

       *with money **unless they want no drugs, different drugs or don't watch TV
bs0u0155, Jun 22 2017
  

       Ah, the incomparable advantages of private medicine ... the illness you want, when you want it.
8th of 7, Jun 22 2017
  

       ...and bragging rights about the higher costs...
Ling, Jun 22 2017
  


 

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