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Tab Disease

Eats tabs that aren’t earning their rent
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Most of us have too many tabs left open. Even if we close them all one day, in a short while we have too many tabs left open.

This idea is a sort of disease which infects a browser of a certain species and kills a tab now and then. Maybe more than one. The criteria is such that we probably wouldn’t notice it gone, the cull simply keeps the number open to a sane level. The criteria shouldn’t be so basic as to be based on merely age of tab opened, or last viewed. It should be a bit smarter than that – the tab that is least useful to us, or least helpful or least beneficial or least pleasant.

Ian Tindale, Apr 07 2019

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       I think the tabs should fight to the death.
Cuit_au_Four, Apr 07 2019
  

       They could solve the problem if they brought back some of the older operating systems that would crash periodically.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 07 2019
  

       Guilty as charged. Home and work. Duh.
blissmiss, Apr 07 2019
  

       I don't have this problem, I tend to close tabs fairly soon after opening them - resorting to "History" functionality as a means of returning to things of interest should they require it.   

       If a history of links is maintained, it should be possible to let those links that we return to more than once to float higher up the list - and, say all the text from each link were extracted and summarised in terms of themes and topics, they could be associated with one another, topically - i.e. w3c specs vs news vs board games and so on.   

       The topics being formed based on your own browsing habits over time. This way, you could get an annual summary, describing how in 2015 you were very much more into permaculture and green woodworking, while 2017 was far more a year for data visualisation and machine learning.
zen_tom, Apr 08 2019
  

       That analysis would be really nice. The problems I have with browser history are that it doesn't go back far enough and that the search only searches the title and URL, not text on the page or the topics the page discusses. I have an extension that purports to search text on the page in my history, but it's never returned a single result for me.
notexactly, Apr 09 2019
  
      
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