Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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The Pedestrian's Sneaky Interactive Shortcut Map

For all your sneaky pedestrian needs
  (+17)(+17)
(+17)
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The fastest way to walk to a certain place is quite often not the fastest way to drive there. And yet, if you used an online route planner, you'll be given directions predicated on you travelling by car. These directions thus neglect to inform you about any footpaths, alleys, steps, footbridges, fields or other shortcuts that you could utilise to shorten your journey.

This could work as a stand alone directions website, or perhaps more practically, and seeing as how many at the halfbakery seem to be enamoured with google, could be an add on feature to the earth or maps programs. Or almost any other map program for that matter.

The wonderful thing about shortcuts is that most people have their own. The standard road map (with most known footpaths marked as well) would allow people to add their own shortcuts, which would then be used by the program when calculating the fastest route to a certain destination (of course, you'd have to specify mode of transport first).

When adding shortcuts, users could also add tags as a suggestion or warning to others (e.g. very muddy after rain, not wheelchair accessible, potentially trespassing etc).

hidden truths, Dec 26 2006

Hobo Markings http://www.angelfir...oustramp/signs.html
Evolved into modern "war chalking." [Ronx, Dec 26 2006]

[link]






       As a part of a personal GPS device, this could be very useful, especially in large cities that you may be visiting, etc.   

       Alternatively, if you travel the same route every day and it's working for you, the software could automatically pick this up as a good route and add it to the database, but where plotting routes ends and tracking your movements begins is a little hazy...
emjay, Dec 26 2006
  

       + nice!
xandram, Dec 26 2006
  

       //and add it to the database// which would be called a ...   

       pedafile
Ling, Dec 26 2006
  

       It seems telling that this was the first thing that came to [21] (if that is his real name)'s mind.
dbmag9, Dec 26 2006
  

       Also very useful for police attempting to cordon off an area where some suspect is believed to be fleeing the scene of a crime.
ye_river_xiv, Dec 27 2006
  

       just picked this up at the cake shop [+]
xenzag, Dec 27 2006
  

       Some TomTom GPSs have an option to select a walking route , as some of their maps have footpaths and alleys included - They're not quite clever enough to take train and subway (or bus tops) in to account - but I'm sure this is on the books.
Dub, Dec 28 2006
  

       It could have its own "sneak-er" launching promo where you get a pair of walking shoes.   

       Mode of transport might need a skill-level specification - e.g. can you ride your skateboard down that concrete stairway rail? If yes, route A. Else, route B.
jenifemeral, Dec 29 2006
  

       I like it [jenifemeral]. Could make deciding your route into one of those choose your own adventure games.   

       Do you think you can make it through the forest?
If yes, continue to Pine Street
If no, turn to Oak Street.
hidden truths, Dec 29 2006
  

       There is a problem: Any route that involves traffic lights will depend on the speed of the walker.   

       For example, I don't walk on Third Avenue because the lights are synchronized just so that they turn red just as I get to them. However, a slower (or faster) walker may find Third Avenue ideal, since the timing may allow him/her to get to each light as it turns green.   

       So for city routes, this website needs some kind of input as to walking speed.
phundug, Dec 29 2006
  
      
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