Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Get half a life.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                                 

The Sands Of Dread

climb sand dune and be filled with dread
  (+4)
(+4)
  [vote for,
against]

Climbing up sand dunes is really hard work. For every foot of progress, there is the never ending slipping backwards, as more sand constantly descends, frustrating and impeding all efforts at maintaining a rapid ascent. This means that it's a good all round form of general exercise, as it requires a combination of aerobic stamina, controlled muscular strength, along with a degree of agility, but also sheer determination and will power. A sort of scrambling action on all fours seems to be one of the most effective techniques.

This is all very well for those with access to the sort of dunes prevalent in places like the Sahara Desert, but what about those who want to benefit from climbing up dunes as a supplement to their regular city gym routines? - enter the Sands Of Dread apparatus.

This piece of equipment mimics the action of climbing up the steep slope of a mountainous sand dune. It can do this because it actually is a sand dune, albeit one of more diminutive proportions. The secret lies in its caterpillar mechanism that constantly takes sand from the bottom of the dune then delivers it to the top where it proceeds to run downhill, like a perpetual waterfall. Think of a right angled triangle with sand moving along the base, then up the back, before tumbling down the hypotenuse.

Contained in its own special heavy perspex box, The Sands Of Dread must be entered with appropriate warnings, and can only begin to operate when the door is closed and sealed to prevent the dispersal of its vital sandy contents.

Prospective dune climbers must set the rate of sand movement along with the angle of inclination before beginning their grueling ascent. The exercise can be increased in ferocity by the transportation of a variety of awkwardly shaped heavy objects, along with a wind that blows the stinging fine particle sand into every sweaty orifice. Overhead heat lamps can also be activated to add to the punishing activity.

As well as being the ultimate horror fitness device, this apparatus also enables reenactments to take place of the notorious scenes in the most excellent 1965 Sidney Lumet film "The Hill", in which British soldiers held in a desert prison camp (including Sean Connery) are punished by being forced to run and down a pyramid of sand, carrying their heavy kit bags in the blazing sun.

xenzag, May 21 2017

Nude Bubble Gym of Death Nude_20Bubble_20Gym_20of_20Death
The Sands of Dread would make a welcome break from the Nude Bubble Gym of Death

Perhaps we need a new category: "Sport: Exercise: Equipment: Sisyphean"? [hippo, May 22 2017]

The Hill https://www.youtube...watch?v=wXRgs2km7yM
initial tracking shot, showing The Hill in "action" [xenzag, May 22 2017]

(?) The Hill http://iceboxmovies...6/hill-1965_23.html
comprehensive review of a great film [xenzag, May 23 2017]

(??) The Hill https://hashed.io/c...g-shot-at-start-how
[hippo, May 23 2017]

[link]






       A large hourglass.
LimpNotes, May 21 2017
  

       Frank Herbert approved.   

       // angle of inclination //   

       The "angle of repose" as it's correctly known is a constant, depending on grain size, humidity, density and a few other factors.   

       Below it, the sand doesn't slide; it just piles up. Above it, the sand will move to achieve equilibrium.   

       This is the reason that sand dunes in an area tend to have very regular, consistent profiles - they converge on a specific angle of repose determined by the constituent material.
8th of 7, May 21 2017
  

       Very nice. Although, how will this simulate an alluring mirage in the far distance?
hippo, May 22 2017
  

       I agree with one of the common 'taters in that youtube clip. I really can't figure out how that tracking shot was actually shot. Typical Sydney Lumet excellence, though.
Ian Tindale, May 22 2017
  

       It's a really odd shot as there are no track marks etc, perhaps a very long boom arm?
xenzag, May 22 2017
  

       hmm it might be filmed in reverse from an in-coming helicopter so that down-draft is negated.
There are only three or so people in the entire shot who would be having to perform by walking backwards to pull it off, and if you look closely at exactly the 2:02 mark you will see that the guys' cane doesn't really make contact with the ground on that backswing.
  

       just sayin   

       It's been referred to as a crane shot. Must have been a crane with a very long jib, but definitely not helicopter. The reverse shot wouldn't work with the falling sand, so it's not that either.
xenzag, May 23 2017
  

       From the title I thought this was going to be a beach resort for rastafarians
hippo, May 23 2017
  

       Add some patches of marram grass, too, to make it harder to find a safe way to the top.
Wrongfellow, May 23 2017
  

       As I was watching it I thought it was a crane shot, but I started to doubt it. As the shot progressed I wondered if it was a suspended camera, on wire, pulled on pulleys by hand. There's the sort of slight camera shake that indicates that. But then it goes round a corner, and carries on tracking back, but in a different direction. I really have no idea how that was done. It could be that the camera was pulled on string on pulleys overhead, then 'passed' as it intercepted another pulley arrangement as it changes direction. Whichever way, mystifying and exceedingly clever. I don't doubt it took many test runs for just getting the camera tracking (and handover, if I'm correct in that theory) correctly done (or done at all, each run). The sky is clear enough to paint out or rotoscope out any evidence of string, pulleys, rods or whatever, so maybe you'd have seen that sort of thing on the original film negs.
Ian Tindale, May 23 2017
  

       I think it was a crane on a truck or bogie. Having watched the bit where it goes past the fence a few times, I'm fairly sure there are no poles or wire on the section it goes through - it's an open gate.
Loris, May 23 2017
  

       I find this explanation (see link) quite believable
hippo, May 23 2017
  

       It is my estimation that the initial moments are carefully handheld, and only when the intention is to move the camera along the trajectory is it 'handed over' (again, carefully) to whatever will carry it on its way.
Ian Tindale, May 23 2017
  

       I've watched it over and over again since this was posted. Definitely not reversed.   

       I'm thinking hot air balloon on a tether maybe.   

       No, a hot air balloon is difficult and expensive - it must be done how it's explained in the link, from a crane on a truck. The fence is quickly pulled into place behind the truck, and there must have been a guy following the truck with a broom, to erase the tyre marks.
hippo, Jun 07 2017
  

       I wouldn't disagree. The initial moments seem to have some kind of very gentle and careful 'handover' at the time that the person is lying on their back, to presumably get it onto a mount of some kind, high up on the means of transport.   

       If it was a vehicle, it is quite handy that there is what seems to be a wide channel of space for it to go down - the men exercising are conveniently outside that space. Even more conveniently, there's quite a lot of them exercising, which might come in useful if all of them were playing a small but parallel part to rapidly sweep and clear, then quickly assume the position of exercising.   

       I was trying to ascertain if there were signs of using a zoom lens at any point, but actually I don't think so - this would have been a carefully chosen favourite prime.   

       Either way, it really is clever, it shows how much engineering and art are often the same thing, and it is quite gratifying even now to inwardly chuckle at the fact that one knows that a vast majority of the audience would have sat and watched it without even questioning it, and if you asked, they'd have shrugged in a 'so what' fashion, as if achieving this sort of shot is perfectly routine.
Ian Tindale, Jun 07 2017
  

       // If it was a vehicle, it is quite handy that there is what seems to be a wide channel of space for it to go down - the men exercising are conveniently outside that space. Even more conveniently, there's quite a lot of them exercising, which might come in useful if all of them were playing a small but parallel part to rapidly sweep and clear, then quickly assume the position of exercising. //   

       Would it not be easier for them to assume the position of exercising in the same place where they had just swept the tire tracks, thereby improving the illusion by occupying that space?
notexactly, Jun 10 2017
  

       Ah! Yes.
Ian Tindale, Jun 10 2017
  

       Exactly how does the vehicle cross the barrier with the low wall and parallel bar type fencing? I think a tower crane with a long jib that swings as well as allows the hanging camera to track backwards.
xenzag, Jun 10 2017
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle