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True Colours

The public might prefer food without any form of artificial colours, given the right introduction to the notion.
  (+12)(+12)
(+12)
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More of a "let's all" or a social movement than a real idea, but anyway.

Given the sudden realisation that we're all eating toxic food thanks to a colouring (Sudan 1, hastily being recalled by the Food Standards Agency - see link to BBC page), wouldn't it be an interesting consumer movement to a] learn what food actually looks like if it's not artificially coloured, and b] learn to prefer it that way.

The actual manifestation of this idea might be no more than a meme, but perhaps a powerful one if encapsulated neatly - and whichever major food manufacturer pre-empts this would perhaps be onto a marketing winner.

Ian Tindale, Feb 21 2005

More contaminated food withdrawn http://news.bbc.co..../health/4282383.stm
"...359 products containing the illegal Sudan 1 dye had been withdrawn." [Ian Tindale, Feb 22 2005]

[link]






       (+) From me. I hate the fact that they dye meat.   

       [UnaBubba] - some retailers add a red colouring to meat to counter the natural grey appearance it takes on after a while. The practice is illegal in this country, but still fairly widespread.   

       The natural colour for margerine is a bland grey, too. Apparently it takes on different shades of yellow depending on what country it's in.
Detly, Feb 22 2005
  

       Butter is naturally white as well. Sort of a creamy white. They add annato to yellow it up to compete with margarine's yellowness.
bristolz, Feb 22 2005
  

       [UB], they colour meat with red rum.
mensmaximus, Feb 22 2005
  

       [Bristolz], even when the milk is sour, the creme still rises to the top.
mensmaximus, Feb 22 2005
  

       Baked beans are not orange. People are not educated to buy them as they naturally look. They prefer the technicolor vivid orange that people think the contents of a tin of baked beans should be.
Ian Tindale, Feb 22 2005
  

       At the risk of making this a list as well as a let's-all, when I were a lad, we used to buy a brand of strawberry jam imported from Poland which had none of the artificial dye that domestic stuff had, and was thus a dull brown colour rather than bright red.
angel, Feb 22 2005
  

       A lot of people (maybe even in the States) still make their own jellies and jams in natural bright colors.
FarmerJohn, Feb 22 2005
  

       I've never heard of meat being dyed. Beef is frequently sprayed with ascorbic acid during the packaging process, which will cause the meat to maintain its red colour.   

       If you have a steak or pack of ground beef which is few days old, you will see that the non-sprayed parts will have gone grey, but the surface stays red. Maybe this is what people are mistaking for dye.
waugsqueke, Feb 22 2005
  

       [angel], I know that Polish jam you are talking about. How come only Poland could make cheap strawberry jam in the world? I heard a rumor that it was part of a war debt. Any money you paid for it was pure profit for somebody.
mensmaximus, Feb 22 2005
  

       //How come only Poland could make cheap strawberry jam //
Well, they saved on the cost of red dye.
angel, Feb 22 2005
  

       Ascorbic acid eh? I can't find anything about dyed meat on the net either, some urban myths are quite believable.   

       A helpful hint: buy the cheaper meat. I mean, the one that’s been marked down a couple of times for quick sale. You might even find it out back, in a big green box, in which case it’s free. But it’s a bit purplish, you say? No problem. Daub it with boot polish and cayenne pepper, and it’ll look absolutely delectable, I promise. And don’t think you can overcook it—you can’t. Blackened is beautiful, remember that.
ldischler, Feb 22 2005
  

       2 fries shy of a happy meal, - but wasnt' yours was the first annotation that initially caused the noise about meat (despite the fact that the current Sudan 1 recall by the Food Standards Agency has pretty much nothing to do with meat being dyed).
Ian Tindale, Feb 22 2005
  

       ldischler, - I'm going to have to nip through the annotations in a short while and knock out the ones that have strayed into irrelevance. No offence, but it'll help keep it straight and focussed. Better still, this gives each annotation author a chance to edit theirs accordingly to avoid this odd and inexplicable diversion into the quite irrelevant topic of meat.
Ian Tindale, Feb 22 2005
  

       Right, it’s not about meat, it's about margarine. I want my margarine natural white, just the way God made it.
ldischler, Feb 22 2005
  

       Yeah, sorry for getting off topic. I'll bring the issue up at our monthly food action group meeting this afternoon. We are discussing school food policy and a few other issues like a 1000 starving desperate people, surrviving minute by minute in this flakey town surrounded by rich farmers.
mensmaximus, Feb 22 2005
  

       I've never understood why some food is dyed. Sure, it looks fresher and better (marketing ploy), but if this 'trend' to dye food never started, we'd just be used to the natural colors and it probably wouldn't bother us to eat a brownish colored strawberry jam, etc.
Machiavelli, Feb 22 2005
  

       //they colour meat with red rum//   

       Red rum, red rum, redrum redrum redrum - The shining   

       Now, that's scary.
Pericles, Feb 22 2005
  

       Makes me feel sick when I think about how when I had medium steak a few nights back, it was a little 'bloody' on the inside, thinking about it, it might be some form of dye... eurgh, or, worse still... ARGH!!!
froglet, Feb 22 2005
  

       as long as the meat is *not* Red Rum.
po, Feb 22 2005
  

       I checked with the local butcher and he says that meat/blood turns red in the presence of oxygen and meat may be redder on the outside. He had no knowledge of anyone dying meat.   

       As an aside, if you ever get a chance to see the animated short, Lupo the Butcher, do so at your own risk but darn, it is odd and inexplicable how we keep diverting to this topic.
mensmaximus, Feb 22 2005
  
      
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