Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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folding rigid wire

Rigid sections of wire fold like an antenna or tent pole.
  [vote for,

Instead of flexible wire that gets all tangled up, use rigid wire sections that plug into each other and fold at the edge or in the middle.

The result: a long wire that you can fold up or break into pieces, with less flexibility than a regular wire but still is somewhat flexible (depending of course on the length of the sections.)

Each section tip has a connector to plug into the next section.

There will be different types of plugs that connect into the end section, for input and output: e.g. for USB, for electrical current, for an audio signal. The plugs for input can be RJ, USB etc, and for output you could have an earphone, a USB out, a charger plug etc.

2 ways to do this.

1. Each section's tips with the connector are extended by a wire. Allowing the plug to turn in any direction.

2. Or, somewhere in the middle, there is a joint or wire that lets it fold. Best if it the joint has two positions: a) free to move and b) rigid - flat.

pashute, Jan 12 2018

Folding Wire https://www.yankode...ree-headphone-wire/
[xenzag, Jan 12 2018]


       It's a good, practical idea, (therefore hardly halfbaked) which inevitably means it's been thought of. (see link) Now if it dances the polka when you switch it on, due to motorised hinges, then it gets my vote.
xenzag, Jan 12 2018

       The more joins, the more electrical resistance and losses. A synaptic analogue join may overcome this.
wjt, Jan 13 2018

       Also, the more joins, the more unreliability.
Ian Tindale, Jan 13 2018


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