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kids names as birthday reminders

  (+2, -1)
(+2, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Call all kids who are born in January "Jan". That way they are more likely to get gifts, cards, phone calls etc as people can't forget their birthdays.

February is a bit of a bugger, so I'd go for Fred and whatever the feminine of that is, March is ok, April needs a masculine or maybe a feminine, May could be interesting, June a doddle, July could be Julie or Julius

and so on..

not_morrison_rm, Jan 24 2014

Native American naming tradition http://www.psycholo...an-naming-tradition
[xandram, Jan 27 2014]

Medieval Saints’ Calendar http://medievalist....calendar/months.htm
[pocmloc, Jan 27 2014]

[link]






       Well, the name of the months already came from names of Norse Gods and others, so this is kind of redundant.
xandram, Jan 24 2014
  

       Yes my nephew was christened Thor Augustus, it does raise eyebrows at school, there is another boy in his class with the same name but their birthdays are a week apart!
pocmloc, Jan 24 2014
  

       Just go with numbers for names, and use a 365 day calendar. I'd probably name kids born on leap days 366 just to avoid confusion.
MechE, Jan 24 2014
  

       Naming convention can definitely be improved upon. I'd prefer if names actually signified something about the person given. Birthdate is one, but in a more meaningful world names would signify something.
rcarty, Jan 24 2014
  

       //I'd prefer if names actually signified something about the person given.   

       That could prove to be self-fulfilling, as a kid called Jerk....   

       //months already came from names of Norse Gods   

       Erm, isn't that the days of the week?
not_morrison_rm, Jan 24 2014
  

       Yeah, days of the week are Norse, well Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday are. Sunday and Monday are astronomical bodies, and Saturday is a Roman god.   

       Months are mostly Roman/ Greek, but only a few are gods (January, March, possibly April but it's a fairly roundabout etymology if true, May, and possibly June with a more direct etymology).
MechE, Jan 24 2014
  

       Cover all of October with ten codes. 10=4 good little buddy.   

       WE Used 10-100 for "Bear Attack". "Meet my Daughter "Bear Attack" She was born late in October right about New Years."
popbottle, Jan 24 2014
  

       I'm obviously missing something, unless you did actually call your daughter "bear attack".
not_morrison_rm, Jan 26 2014
  

       If I must clarify that I wrote //Norse and others// as I wasn't looking it up at the time.
  

       I like the Native American view on names. [see link]
xandram, Jan 27 2014
  

       Anyway, facebook does the birthday reminders.
xandram, Jan 27 2014
  

       Actually I think this was well baked up to 1000 or more years ago with the widespread tradition of naming a child after that day’s saint <link>
pocmloc, Jan 27 2014
  

       //I like the Native American view on names.//   

       I distrust any source that treats Native Americans as a monolithic entity.
MechE, Jan 27 2014
  

       That source isn't the only source for Native American philosophy of naming. Distrust if you must.
xandram, Jan 27 2014
  

       //Native Americans as a monolithic entity   

       Hmmmm....   

       //If I must clarify that I wrote //Norse and others// as I wasn't looking it up at the time   

       That's ok, I make stuff up all the time too.   

       //facebook..   

       <hawks and spits on floor><falling intonation>Facebook?</falling> intonation>
not_morrison_rm, Jan 27 2014
  
      
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