Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
A few slices short of a loaf.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                         

medicated laundry detergent

Your garments smell fresh, so it is possible there are milligrams of purposeful chemical residues. peptide drugs are effective at micrograms or less. Put peptide drugs in laundry detergent to prevent disease and make people live longer
 
(0)
  [vote for,
against]

Your garments smell fresh from the laundry, so it is possible there are milligrams of purposeful chemical residues. Peptide drugs are effective at micrograms or less. Put peptide drugs in laundry detergent to prevent diesease and make people live longer

One possible contact peptide is AEDG, epitalon, which prevents cancers (among these breast cancer) in mice and makes them live longer. Others might create laundry polypill with other peptides.

think of the absorption rate on underwear!

beanangel, Apr 20 2017

pubmed epitalon references about preventing cancer https://www.ncbi.nl...d&from_uid=12428286
[beanangel, Apr 20 2017]

peptide that causes drugs to transport more rapidly through demis https://www.ncbi.nl...rticles/PMC4128962/
[beanangel, Apr 26 2017]

[link]






       Don't fill the same text into the summary as you then put into the description. We're present for the reading of both sections of the article, so we'll easily spot that you've duplicated the initial paragraphs, because they're both there together one after the other.
Ian Tindale, Apr 20 2017
  

       This is an excellent idea. Admittedly, you'd have to find a way to stop the peptides being digested by the proteases in most current washing powders; and then you'd have to find a completely original way to make peptides migrate through your skin; and also have to regulate washing powders in the same way that the drugs themselves would be regulated. But, other than that, there are only a few additional problems.   

       Ah, hang on. The statement "peptide drugs are effective at micrograms or less" is for the most part wrong, with a very, very few exceptions. It's also worth noting that mice are considerably smaller than humans, so even epithalon would need to be delivered in tens-of-milligram quantities to achieve the same concentration. But other than that, no problems.   

       And what Ian said. It's just irritating.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 20 2017
  

       Ditto on what Max and Ian said.   

       Wouldn't most active peptides be locally acting so small amounts would be normal? The biggest problem here being the galactic travel and survival ability from undies to target cell machinery.   

       Maybe via nose capillaries then there would be a good reason to sniff undies.
wjt, Apr 24 2017
  

       Leads one to wonder how many household products are laced with skin-absorptive addictive substances.
FlyingToaster, Apr 25 2017
  

       I thought skin was pretty much impermeable - isn't that largely the whole point of skin? If skin was easily permeable you'd drown in the shower.
hippo, Apr 25 2017
  

       //I thought skin was pretty much impermeable// Some things will perm it. You can always add DMSO to stuff - makes skin permeable to a good number of things.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 25 2017
  

       "" One possible contact peptide is AEDG, epitalon, which prevents cancers (among these breast cancer) in mice and makes them live longer. ""   

       Can you put the AEDG in a spray can ? Or maybe aerosol ?   

       That would make it easier to get the stuff on the tiny bras that mice wear.   

       ---- I got in the habit of duplicating the summary in the first paragraph, because spellcheck doesn't work on the summary part at least in my hopeless old computer. So I won't do that as much, but I am still a hopeless speller. And would just drive past any Halfbakery spelling bee.
popbottle, Apr 25 2017
  

       actually some peptides are used to hasten the transport of drugs at the dermis. [link] so a couple peptides might be better.
beanangel, Apr 26 2017
  

       Ah, that explains all the Tide commercials then.
normzone, Apr 26 2017
  

       //some peptides are used to hasten the transport of drugs at the dermis// Yes, but it's no good transporting them at the dermis. They need to go through the epidermis and also through the dermis, if they're supposed to be having a systemic effect.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 26 2017
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle