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snap-together christmas lights

no more tangled strings
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Rope lights are nice to use because the bulb is inside the strand making it less likely to break a bulb. The problem is that the strand is too ridged to bend around a door frame or window pane. I suggest making a stick of lights that can be connected to other sticks to form a strait line of lights. The sticks can come in different lengths from one foot to three foot and even smaller to make it easy to custom fit around window frames. they can be different colors of course and you won't have to trash the whole set if one stick goes out. They can be taken apart for easy storage like a toy train track. clips can be easilly used to attach the sticks or screw holes can be fitted for a permenant installation. Sticks can also be made with a hinge or swivel to get really precise fittings. Words could be spelled out easier on the roof or lawn. Some sticks could have no lights say for those areas where you want to jump from one window to another and so on.
Sizematters, Feb 25 2007

countdown http://www.allcapec...optillchristmas.cfm
[po, Feb 25 2007]

[link]






       [po] Are you ready?
xandram, Feb 25 2007
  

       hell, in planning stages for 2008.   

       ;)
po, Feb 26 2007
  

       Sorry, but my inner pedant is forcing me to do this - sp: rigid, straight, permanent.   

       This sounds very interesting but it brings up a bunch of questions. Such as how far apart are the lights spaced on the stick? How far apart are the swivels/hinges? Is there a way to design the end connectors to allow a Y-split? Or a 3-way, even a 4-way split?   

       The swivels/hinges could have click-stops inside them for straight runs, in-storage, and right-angle settings (0, 90, 180, 270 degrees). There could even be holes in each stick for nailing them in place on your house.   

       If you can answer my questions I have a warm flaky bun with your name on it.
Canuck, Feb 26 2007
  

       Canuck,thanks for the spellcheck. I would say the lights should be spaced 1 inch apart and the stick could be clear with colored bulbs or colored with clear bulbs. There can be three-way or four-way splitters due to the sticks bi-directional connector. I'm Thinking the sticks should be round so that no matter which way the sticks are connected, you will still see the lights. Every end is designed the exact same way so sticks and splitters can connect or " snap " together going foward or backward. This joint would have a hole it for a nail or a ring with a tab and hole to use in case the stick was twisted. Or use a swivle here. Hinges would connect in the same matter. You could even add rope lights with the use of a special coupler for really neat writing. Hope this helps clearify my idea and not focus on my spelling.
Sizematters, Feb 28 2007
  

       Sizematters, I hope you don't mind the size of the pastry I'm giving this idea. And I distracted my inner pedant so it would leave your spelling alone this time.   

       Every December I try to spell out "NOEL" on my big picture window using a very long string of lights and several dozen of those little clear suction cups with the hook on them, but no matter how much I plan and stick and move and tweak the layout it ends up looking like "mooie" instead. Snap-together lights will make it so easy to spell out nearly anything. When will they be in stores?
Canuck, Feb 28 2007
  

       Some sticks could have wires only ( bulbless) to put between letters giving power to the next letter or crossing a walkway or door entryway and so on. The rigid design could be supported at the corners or even sitting on the floor with a stand type attachment or spikes driven in the ground for the front yard.
Sizematters, Feb 28 2007
  
      
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