Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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undo buttons

unlock the car you just erroneously locked
  (+4, -2)
(+4, -2)
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How about making a simple 'undo' button on car doorlocks.

How many times have you just slammed your car door, to 'instantly' remember your keys were in the ignition or set them in the trunk. Of course the door is now locked. With an 'undo' built into the keyhole of the door, you could have 3-5 seconds to undo the damage. This functionality could be disabled, if you have the key in your hand and have locked the door using the electronic button on the key.

doctorbill, Sep 29 2006

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       It sounds like a good idea, but I think most people might like about 10 seconds instead.
BJS, Sep 29 2006
  

       In the old days, we used a HideAKey cache secreted somewhere on the car's bodywork. In the early 1980's we advanced to the use of entry-code door locks. In the later 1980's we started using remote control door locks. At the same time a lot of people started carrying portable cell phones and were thereby able to call an emergency service number provided by their car manufacturer which would magically allow their vehicle to be opened remotely in the situation you describe. All three of these solutions seem as convenient and probably more secure than the product enhancement you describe.
jurist, Sep 30 2006
  

       I keep a spare key in my wallet...it's a nobrainer.
xandram, Sep 30 2006
  
      
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