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Don’t Encourage Lexical Theft

A movement (not a let’s all) a movement. It’s a movement.
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I’m (not for the first time) undergoing through a phase of refusing to acknowledge words to do with new technology or new media that are actually stolen and plagiarised from an older extant other meaning. This is outright theft which we should not be left to put up with, downright. The specific cases I’m objecting to are where a word hasn’t died out or become extinct or obsolete or dwindled in usage. It is where the word is just as alive as it ever was, but along comes a new tech concept and rather than invent a new concatenation of sounds from the near- infinity of vocalisations a human can put together, they just steal an existing word and load their new slightly related (if you believe what they claim) meaning on top of it. This is bad, and must be stopped.
Ian Tindale, Apr 08 2018

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       This is just going to make words longer. Soon we'll be talking at the rate of Ents.   

       We could repurpose words that have completely fallen out of usage, like slubberdegulion.
RayfordSteele, Apr 08 2018
  

       I am in violent agreement. The egregious hijacking of the well-established term "social engineering" by vocabulary-impaired IT hipsters set my head spinning. Still, I suppose it's easier to say than "anti-social SOB shot in the dark to rip off your password".
Whistlebritches, Apr 08 2018
  

       "Engineering" is the first term that should be freed. If you don't do something that involves an actual internal or external combustion engine, you ain't an engineer.
RayfordSteele, Apr 08 2018
  

       Could that be stretched to cover fission or fusion too, [Ray] ?   

       We are in agreement in principle, altho the devil is in the detail ...
8th of 7, Apr 08 2018
  

       Maybe... although the term fissioneer has a nice sound to it.
RayfordSteele, Apr 08 2018
  

       "Rev 2" ?
FlyingToaster, Apr 08 2018
  

       Careful, [RayfordSteele], engineering as a profession/"thing" is a lot older than the IC engine...
Although I do like this idea.
<very slightly off topic>
Many years ago (last time I was looking for a new job), I recall one ad I came across was for a "Nail Technician" (I'm a mechanical engineer, so my "search" on the job website was reasonably specific).
Expecting a position at a wood-fastening production factory, I clicked through. But NO, it was a job at a beauty salon.
Grrrr....
</vsot>
neutrinos_shadow, Apr 08 2018
  

       //The specific cases I’m objecting to are where a word hasn’t died out or become extinct or obsolete or dwindled in usage.// But, if you're eliminating new meanings assigned to old (but still healthy) words, you'll be left with: "The __ __ I’m objecting to are __ a word hasn’t __ out or become __ or obsolete or __ in usage."
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 08 2018
  

       //If you don't do something that involves an actual internal or external combustion engine, you ain't an engineer.//   

       Ah, but the original (and not yet obsolete) sense of "engine" is "something embodying ingenuity" - in early usage typically a trap or a weapon. So the on-board computer in a car is an engine just as much as the part that coughs and rolls over.
pertinax, Apr 09 2018
  

       Aren’t the i and the e in each other’s places?
Ian Tindale, Apr 09 2018
  

       The word "theft" is being misused here and is casually given a new meaning by the author to suit their narrative, quite different from its historical meaning. This idea seems to be not about theft, which implies the taking possession of another's property, but rather the practice of forcing a change in meaning on a word to label a new concept, rather than explaining that new concept properly.
hippo, Apr 09 2018
  

       Also, I’d say it is effectively obsolete if the majority of people speaking the language had no idea whatsoever that engine was in the least bit related to ingenuity. If not obsolete, then effectively disconnected in the common usage. The words that need action in this scenario of this idea are those that normal people use normally at normal times for normal things, and then all of a sudden, the whole software industry has decided to kidnap those normal everyday words and trot them out in relation to some abstract faffing about nonsense that you can’t see, isn’t a thing and doesn’t work anything like the thing that the word was stolen from – merely because of some loose tenuous mechanistic analogy in the mind of the person first conceiving and then stealing the name. Find your own names.
Ian Tindale, Apr 09 2018
  

       But isn’t a name a property? It certainly is in JSON. Wait, damn!
Ian Tindale, Apr 09 2018
  

       //Ah, but the original (and not yet obsolete) sense of "engine" is "something embodying ingenuity"// Yes, but before _that_ it meant the furrow in the brow of a capybara confronted with an unfamiliar situation.
MaxwellBuchanan, Apr 09 2018
  

       "Engine" and "Ingenious" are much more homonymous than synonymous.   

       If you were to push root synonymity then you'd be stuck trying to justify "ingenue", "genuflection", "genetics", etc. , and a whole bunch more, fully or partially supplanted by other etymologies - "implant", "indigenous", "noble", "talent" - all having latin words beginning with "ingen..."
FlyingToaster, Apr 09 2018
  

       //This is just going to make words longer. Soon we'll be talking at the rate of Ents//   

       So basically Latin then?   

       Pretty much how that one works with new concepts to the language isn't it?
Skewed, Apr 09 2018
  

       I think this idea is already baked, isn't it? I mean, is anybody actually encouraging lexical theft? The theft is obviously happening, always was & always will be, but I don't see crowds of people marching in the streets in the cause of more lexical theft. I don't hear people chatting on their mobiles about how much better the world would be if more words & phrases were hijacked & put to inappropriate use. Lack of discouragement is not the same as encouragement.

Also, the English language would cease to exist if we went down this road. Every other word in the language has been nicked from someone else.
DrBob, Apr 09 2018
  

       Not as bad as welsh, where the original vocabulary was limited to "rain", "rock", "grass", "family" (meaning both human and sheep) and "incest" (meaning any form of non-solo sexual activity).   

       Even "mud" is an imported word, as before the Romans explained the technology the welsh didn't know how to make it.
8th of 7, Apr 09 2018
  

       //Aren’t the i and the e in each other’s places?//   

       They're borrowing a cup of sugar.
pertinax, Apr 09 2018
  

       //the English language would cease to exist if we went down this road. Every other word in the language has been nicked from someone else.//   

       Ian's not suggesting we stop stealing from others [Bob] just that they shouldn't steal from us.
Skewed, Apr 09 2018
  

       Ah, well that's OK then.
DrBob, Apr 09 2018
  

       England took over huge chunks of North America, the Indian subcontinent, and Australasia, and it was never called "theft" or "stealing"*, so obviously it's fine for England to take quite large things without asking, and keep them.   

       *There may have been the occasional bit of muttering, but only from foreigners, and there's no accounting for their funny foreign ways.
8th of 7, Apr 09 2018
  

       Are we playing Torpenhow Hill again ?   

       Maybe fund social media bots to post word definitions in context to keep old language alive.   

       //hijacking of the well-established term "social engineering"//   

       To be fair the original use that resulted in Milton Keynes wasn't going anywhere either.
bigsleep, Apr 10 2018
  

       Social engineering is obviously where people are friendly to each other, over a beer or wine or two, and dismantle motorcycle engines or reassemble steam trains, in a social setting. That must be what it means.
Ian Tindale, Apr 11 2018
  

       //England took over huge chunks of North America, the Indian subcontinent, and Australasia//   

       Gotta wonder what the world would be like if we hadn't cocked all that up.   

       Imagine an alternate world where the UK decided to be a touch more inclusive, federalised & gave them all representation in parliament before the colonies got sniffy about things. The US, Canada, Australia, India & all the other bits an bobs we picked up along the way all still part of the same empire.. accept it wouldn't be an empire of course. All with their own representatives sitting as members of the federal parliament.   

       England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland (all of it not just that little bitty patch up north) & probably Cornwall each with its own regional government.   

       With parliament in London as the seat of federal government the English regional government would probably be in Colchester or something.   

       Would have made for a different First & Second world war & chances are neither The League of Nations or the UN would have ever come about either, we might have looked so big & nasty the first world war never happened* & not weakened by that an intervention on behalf of the Russian royals during the revolution wouldn't have been out of order (pushed for by their relatives on our throne), Russia still Imperial, one strategic royal wedding later & Russia joins the union (so how much of the worlds landmass & population would that be under one federal government?).   

       * So the Kaiser wouldn't have abdicated, one more royal wedding (or the right deaths) & we've got the German empire & all their holdings too.   

       Can't say the world would have been better for it but it sure would be different, probably in some strange & unexpected ways (to us) as well, the knock on effects would be a bit hard to predict or quantify for something like that, can't see the space race being driven by politics as a proxy war twixt East & West so chances are good we wouldn't have been to the moon yet for one.
Skewed, Apr 11 2018
  

       [Skewed]; I like your thoughts... except the moon bit.
I would think that, instead of a "race" (with the result "been there, done that, no need to continue"), we (as a more-or-less global co-operation) would have gone to the moon for it's own sake, and we would still be there; probably not "permanent" YET, but missions would be a regular occurrence.
neutrinos_shadow, Apr 11 2018
  

       I don't like the lack of moon idea any better myself.   

       But don't forget that without the war Germany wouldn't have funded rocket science the way it did & the speed these things seem to go in peace time it could easily have been another ten or twenty years or more before we were up to the stage we were at the end of the war.   

       Without that expertise transplanted to the states at the end of WW2 there's no way the moon landings would have happened when they did.   

       On the upside we'd have airships cruising the skies like giant flying cruise liners instead..   

       Without WW1 the US would never have banned the sale of helium to Germany in the run up to WW2 & they wouldn't have had to use hydrogen for the hindenburgh, it wouldn't have blown up & public confidence in airships wouldn't have taken the pummeling it did, the industry was going from strength to strength before that, without that disaster there's every reason to expect it would have really taken off (pun intended).   

       Especially during the early years of commercial air travel when planes weren't as good as they were by the end of WW2 & once it was top dog chances are business inertia would keep it there for a while (once you have something that works there's a tendency to stick with the familiar, plus vested interests come into play).   

       [Afterthought] Oh, and Hiroshima would never have happened, Nuclear power almost certainly arrives later than it did & we may have had power stations before anyone thought to make a bomb (borg excluded of course).   

       [After Afterthought] No WW2 means no holocaust either so no Israel.
Skewed, Apr 11 2018
  

       Bizarrely, per passenger-mile, hydrogen filled airships are much safer than helicopters.   

       For example, in an airship, should all the engines stop it is a viable option to float around for several hours while trying to fix the problem and work out what to do next. This is not the case with a helicopter, where the only option is "plummet to ground (or sea) level immediately. Do not pass 'GO'. Do not request landing clearance. Please tick box for interrment or cremation* should any identifiable remains be found".   

       In an airship, it is routine for the Captain, after a large lunch in the dining room and a conversation with the passengers, to nip off to his cabin for an afternoon nap.   

       Passengers on helicopters rarely have the opportunity to lean out of the windows and drop pieces of orange peel on those on the ground below.   

       On an airship, the approximate date of arrival can be displayed on a calendar pinned to the notice board, alongside details of this evening's menu for dinner, the time of the Bridge party, and a notice of an earring found in the library.   

       *May not be optional if the cause of the crash is other than engine flameout due to fuel exhaustion.
8th of 7, Apr 11 2018
  

       And also bigger.
Ian Tindale, Apr 11 2018
  

       //per passenger-mile//   

       A lot cheaper too.
Skewed, Apr 11 2018
  

       //per passenger-mile//   

       A lot cheaper too.
Skewed, Apr 11 2018
  

       //This idea seems to be not about theft, which implies the taking possession of another's property, but rather the practice of forcing a change in meaning on a word to label a new concept, rather than explaining that new concept properly.//   

       That's right! I used to just dislike happy stick bundles, and now I'm banned from half the bars in Oregon.   

       Go git yer own words!   

       if one book contained all of the possible synonyms for every word in every human language, would it be a Plethorasaurus?   

       The ultimate conclusion to all this is that a handful of apparently meaningful words become the ones which mean everything, all at the same time, in all domains.
Ian Tindale, Apr 12 2018
  

       what
pocmloc, Apr 12 2018
  

       // a handful of apparently meaningful words become the ones which mean everything, all at the same time, in all domains. //   

       Newspeak "A" vocabulary ...
8th of 7, Apr 12 2018
  
      
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