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Microgreen Pendulum

Swinging greens
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Have recently washed birdshit off rocket for my egg mayo sandwich, I'm a big fan of indoor grown microgreens. In fact, there are even some soil free artificial growth mediums to further remove the chances of insect parts in your salad.

A typical basement farm consists of shelving units with lighting on each level to illuminate shallow trays of herbs and other small plants. It also seems to involve a large number of fans to keep air circulating (randomly).

Now, what if the shelves themselves were suspended like a swing ? An actuator and sensor could keep the shelving unit gentling swinging, forcing nice dry air through the plants. Multiple shelves could be connected with tie rods so they all swing at the same frequency.

Placing a fan in the corner of the room would seem particularly ineffective rather than swinging the plant through the air.

bigsleep, Jul 14 2019

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       Can't be seen arriving for lunch in a dirty rocket… [+]
notexactly, Jul 14 2019
  

       One extra variable is the air CO2. Some bloke on the internet said that veggies have a tendency to grow large and tasteless given the doubling of CO2 concentration in recent years (he didn't comment on people).
bigsleep, Jul 15 2019
  

       It is possible you only have to refresh the air at the .1-1.0 mm right near the leaf surface. That would give the ability to just vibrate, gently and harmlessly and minutely the trays the plants were growing on.   

       If you have artistic feelings the vibrations that lightly stir the air near the leaf surface could be musical, so people walking around would think the plants sounded beautiful.
beanangel, Jul 16 2019
  

       Taste would be due to complexity. Complexity of soil constituents and of molecules in the air from the biome animals and bordering plant flora. Putting it another way, any thing isolated is going to be a bit tasteless.   

       Maybe , those insect bits are needed.
wjt, Jul 16 2019
  

       My thought on the "tasteless": the plants grow fast in the high-CO2, so they don't have time to gather all the "other" nutrients etc that contribute to "taste". Probably less dense too (as per fast-growing wood is weaker/lighter than slow- growing wood).
neutrinos_shadow, Jul 16 2019
  

       ^ Same with force feeding. No taste.   

       I would just like to go on record as saying that this idea rocks.   

       As a fellow anti-nature food person, I like it! The swinging would also encourage the stems to be a bit stronger (just like plants growing stronger against the wind) which might provide a more chewable texture.
unhelpful_fool, Jul 17 2019
  

       // It is possible you only have to refresh the air at the .1-1.0 mm right near the leaf surface. That would give the ability to just vibrate, gently and harmlessly and minutely the trays the plants were growing on. //   

       This would only work well if the vibration was at the resonant frequency of each given leaf. Therefore, you could use broad-spectrum noise or a frequency comb to vibrate all of the leaves, or you could use a single frequency to train (and eventually select) the plants to grow leaves of a certain size.
notexactly, Jul 22 2019
  
      
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