Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Triangle Storage Containers

Three flat edges for food storage receptacles.
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Most storage containers that food can be squirrelled away into are either oblong or round. This is ideal if there’s absolutely nothing else in the universe around it, but in some cases there’s a fridge it has to be put into, and other things in said fridge.

I propose triangular shaped food storage receptacles. The question is, isosceles or right-angle (or even equilateral)? The natural inclination is to say right-angle triangles are best because they tesselate and stack and butt up against other flat edges. I’d say the problem with that is they’re difficult to wash up with the fairly acute angles in each corner. One solution to that is to round the corners with a huge radius, another is to simply chop the corners off and create what is actually a hexagon that resembles a triangle shape.

However, I suspect that counterintuitively, equilateral triangles (again, with radiused or truncated corners to prevent food traps in cleaning) are probably going to be the better, in the long run. Different sized triangle storage dishes are likely, rather than all the same size, and it may be found that a fairly optimum arrangement of tucking in and sliding around could be found to fit an assortment of them together on one plane, as one edge fits against several other edges of others.

It could be that a smart fridge actually suggests where things should go as you put in a new one, or it could be that the tetris candy crush generation simply doesn’t see it as a problem.

Ian Tindale, Jan 20 2016

Umm... https://www.google....4MKHYqkAcEQ_AUIBigB
My step mom has a set for us to bring her apple pie slices home [evilpenguin, Jan 20 2016]

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       I think hexagons would be a good compromise - they pack just as well as triangles (or better if you're rounding the corners), use less stuff to make, and are easier to clean.
If you're bothered about the half-hexagon spaces wasted at an edge, you could also make trapezium-shaped containers.
  

       //... or it could be that the tetris candy crush generation simply doesn’t see it as a problem.//   

       Reminds me of when I was in the pantry and switched a jar of raspberry jam with a three-fruit marmalade. Lost a whole year's supply of jam in the resulting chain reaction. Made a row of five, so I got a starfruit preserve out of it at least.
Loris, Jan 20 2016
  

       But most fridges are three-dimensional so you need something which tessellates in 3D, like a tetrahedron.
hippo, Jan 20 2016
  

       // One solution to that is to round the corners with a huge radius, another is to simply chop the corners off and create what is actually a hexagon that resembles a triangle shape. //   

       ... or best of all, just drive a steamroller over them.
8th of 7, Jan 20 2016
  

       Latest discovery from the cutting edge of half-baked science: cuboids (and their two-dimensional reductions, rectangles) have been found to tesselate fairly well!   

       Tune in next week for a special edition on the unique properties of water as a wetting agent. We'd tell you more, but we haven't finished with the experiments yet!
pocmloc, Jan 20 2016
  

       Imperfect tessilation is a feature when using circulating cold air to cool food. Round does this and also lacks stress raisers which lead to cracks in hot/cold cycles. Round is also pleasing to the eye and is always facing the right direction. Long live round!
the porpoise, Jan 20 2016
  
      
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