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Stereoscopic Upholstery

Make public transport more visually entertaining
  (+14, -1)(+14, -1)
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The seats on busses and trains are often upholstered with material which bears a repeating pattern. Such patterns are ideal for encoding `magic eye' style single image stereograms. It should be a simple matter, in this day and age of computer controlled looms and the like, to build in a variety of fascinating 3D images or abstract patterns at the weaving stage. This would add more interest to journeys, especially late at night, when the trains are half empty, and the eyes are already crossed due to drink.

Perhaps this idea could be extended to architecture, with the regularity of the windows on large office blocks, or even the brickwork, recruited for this purpose.

Mickey the Fish, Sep 14 2000

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       Graffito.
thumbwax, Sep 19 2000
  

       Cool idea! That stuff DOES sort of look like a textile print or wallpaper pattern or something.
Duffi, May 07 2001
  

       A real fun idea could be to create a magic eye print seat cover and decor that looked like someone sitting down on the seat. Imagine the last train home with a whole bunch drunk people all standing up because they think the bus/train is full.
Ivy, May 15 2001
  

       Absolutely brilliant! I'm going to start looking for this everytime I board a bus now. When people ask, "Why are you staring at your seat?" I'll tell them, "I'm looking for the cow."
jadi, Jun 18 2005
  
      
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