Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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little livers everywhere

Metabolizes more Lactic Acid
 
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This artificial organ would use the Cori cycle to metabolize Lactic acid from one's muscles. They would be grown in batches from skin-derived stem cells and a piece of the patient's own liver. Then they would be installed (injected?) directly beside all the muscles of the body wherever they may fit.

Permits far greater stints of anaerobic respiration. Great athletic feats! New world records!

Voice, Oct 07 2007

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       I like the idea. You could keep some in the freezer for injection after a night of far too much alcohol.
vincevincevince, Oct 07 2007
  

       By the way, what would happen if you had little livers everywhere, and they weren't connected with anything? cancer?
Voice, Oct 07 2007
  

       I'm not sure, but I'd always thought that lactic acid stayed pretty close to where it was made, and was oxidised in situ (within the muscle cell) rather than being shipped out to the liver (hence, only the overworked muscles experience "burn" after exertion). But maybe I'm wrong?
MaxwellBuchanan, Oct 07 2007
  

       1. Growing new livers from skin derived stem cells is magic. If this could be done, people who had bad livers could just grow themselves new ones instead of hoping for transplant.   

       2. The muscles themselves do most of the work metabolizing lactic acid. If you go anaerobic enough to raise blood levels other muscles have at the lactic acid. Lactic acid is good food.
bungston, Oct 08 2007
  
      
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