Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
"More like a cross between an onion, a golf ball, and a roman multi-tiered arched aquaduct."

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                                           

100th Anniversary Mayan Calendar Oreo

The resemblance is almost eerie.
  (+12)(+12)
(+12)
  [vote for,
against]

2012 is it. The year the Oreo turns 100 years old. The Mayans must've known this, hence the reason their calendar predicts its shape. To celebrate, Nabisco should make a Mayan calendar Oreo for mass consumption and bury a few in strange pyramid-shaped boxes somewhere in a jungle...
RayfordSteele, Mar 16 2012

Calendar in question... http://www.toptenz..../mayan-calendar.jpg
Just add milk... [RayfordSteele, Mar 16 2012, last modified May 14 2015]

Oreo https://www.google....jT87ACNCbtwef2f3wBw
Maybe if we twist it the right way, it'll tell us the future. [RayfordSteele, Mar 16 2012]

[link]






       The Stone Of The Fifth Sun is Aztec, but i know what you mean. Also, they counted in vigesimal, so a hundredth anniversary wouldn't be so significant to them.
nineteenthly, Mar 16 2012
  

       Maybe they worshipped Oreos?
RayfordSteele, Mar 16 2012
  

       Oreos was presumably some kind of Greek god?
nineteenthly, Mar 16 2012
  

       Does anyone know where this December 21st bull$#!+ came from? I thought the Mayan calandar ended sometime in the summer.
Alterother, Mar 16 2012
  

       There's more than one calendar and they phase in and out with each other.
nineteenthly, Mar 16 2012
  

       (+) heh! love it!
  

       My theory is that they were just planning to turn the calendar over and start again! Oreos for all!!
xandram, Mar 16 2012
  

       I kind of figure they thought that there wasn't much point in calculating it more than a couple thousand years in advance and planned to update it as needed.
Alterother, Mar 16 2012
  

       Sortof like our approach to COBOL and Y2k.
RayfordSteele, Mar 16 2012
  

       There are inscriptions mentioning dates thousands of years after today and many powers of twenty above the few millenia covered by the bottom few places of the Long Count. I seem to remember it's twenty-odd aeons long altogether.
nineteenthly, Mar 16 2012
  

       My Fuzzy Kittens calendar shows time ending on December 31st. It just ends ... there's nothing after that. Not even kittens. [+]
baconbrain, Mar 16 2012
  

       // Not even kittens //   

       That's some good news, at least.   

       Has anyone tried dunking a Pre-Columbian calendar stone in a mug of hot tea ?
8th of 7, Mar 16 2012
  

       //Does anyone know where this December 21st bull$#!+ came from? I thought the Mayan calandar ended sometime in the summer.//   

       That IS summer, mate. [+] for the post and for [baconbrain]'s kitten calendar anno.
AusCan531, Mar 16 2012
  

       //That IS summer, mate// in the southern hemisphere, where, by a bizarre coincidence, the Mayans (and the Aztecs) lived. In particular, it's close to the summer solstice.
spidermother, Mar 16 2012
  

       Right... Sorry, didn't mean to be so geocentric.
Alterother, Mar 16 2012
  

       // in the southern hemisphere, where, by a bizarre coincidence, the Mayans (and the Aztecs) lived. //   

       That is bizarre. All my maps show the Yucatan (and Mexico City) about at 20 degrees north.
baconbrain, Mar 16 2012
  

       Sorry, didn't mean to be so geoignorant.
spidermother, Mar 16 2012
  

       President Kennedy did the same thing. I think it was Kennedy. I am so presignorant.
baconbrain, Mar 16 2012
  

       No, JFK was confectionignorant, which forunately is a condition that will never afflict any of us.
Alterother, Mar 16 2012
  

       //presignorant// That's all right, we're all presscient in hindsight.
spidermother, Mar 17 2012
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle