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Auditory Environmental Interaction

I think you can
  (+2)
(+2)
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against]

auditorily interact with your environment by listening to the background noise created by your computer, the refrigerator, the heating system and tinnitus and pull various chords out of it so that you can hear progressions of chords. I dont know if I am saying that the right way, but its a phenomena in my world. When its quiet except for all of that background noise, all the notes are present, and you can think different chords and they come out of the background. I think you are not just hearing them inside your head but you are creating them in the real world and there should be some way to record or amplify them. Not sure how to say it other than that.

Now that I think about it, the fan in the space heater may be an important part of this.

JesusHChrist, Mar 14 2017

[link]






       I understand what you're talking about.
Our minds tune-out background noise and yours has figured out how to selectively un-block real sounds which correspond to the music in your head.
  

       Neat trick.   

       Can you also hear voices?
pashute, Mar 15 2017
  

       //I think you are not just hearing them inside your head but you are creating them in the real world// I think you are creating them in your head from real-world sounds, by filtering. Audio processing should be able to do the same thing - selectively filter out noise that didn't contribute toward a given chord.
MaxwellBuchanan, Mar 15 2017
  

       This sounds like the auditory equivalent of seeing whatever you want to see in the "snow" on a TV that isn't receiving a signal.
notexactly, Mar 21 2017
  
      
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