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Automatic number of columns

Allow more than three.
  (+2, -1)
(+2, -1)
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The layout of the halfbakery is nice and simple, but it wastes far too much space for those viewing with high resolutions. When viewing a category such as "culture", it displays exactly three columns, regardless of how much space is available to the right [link]. This forces the user to needlessly scroll to view the entire list.

If the number of columns were decided based on the current window size, this could be avoided. The only way I know of doing this without java is to get the user's current resolution througn the browser and reformat with a CGI script. Perhapse those with more HTML experience could suggest an alternative.

Aq_Bi, May 02 2005

My view of the culture category http://img203.echo....03/8963/temp6bx.png
Not enough columns. [Aq_Bi, May 02 2005]

[link]






       There's a further problem in that the available screen size (and resolution) doesn't necessarily relate to the bigness of the browser window. For example, I'm looking at this on my iBook, which has a screen size of 1024 by 768 pixels, and a resolution of 106dpi (or is it 108 - can't remember). However, I rarely keep Safari open full screen, preferring instead to just let it open the default width (which is significantly less than full screen), so you'd have to also figure out how wide the actual user-agent viewport is at this point in time. Then, if for some reason the user resizes the window (which they're always at liberty to do), it'd have to recalculate this on the fly, dynamically, and perhaps rewrap and reflow. Not easy.
Ian Tindale, May 02 2005
  

       One option would be to let the user specify the number of columns. This value would be stored in a cookie instead of the user's profile, to allow the use of multiple computers.
Aq_Bi, May 03 2005
  

       Three columns is a good number for reading, I find.
Detly, May 03 2005
  
      
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