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Breezy cubicles, an actual invention

The cover story of an HVAC journal notes that fresher air causes students to do math 14 pt faster with equal accuracy Here we restructure the cubicle to have ventilation panels plus an optional photovoltaic fan
 
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Getting 10 pt more productivity from office workers without bothering them would be marvelous

It is also possible that super cheap ways to gain productivity are noticeably appreciated during a recession

October 2006 ASHRAE Journal had a cover story where highly ventilated classrooms caused students to do more than 14 pt more math at equal or better accuracy to the standard ventilation version

I think that ordinary fabric covered office partitions could have the upper panel be a breezeway behind the fabric

also a breezeway near the base would contribute to moving airflow rather than still air

One thing about this that is kind of nice is that a semiskilled person could go refurbishing fabric covered dividers to create better ventilation possibly cheaper than getting new dividers

This might also be an opportunity to put a super quiet photovoltaic fan with the photovoltaic panels along the top which is an amusing opportunity to develop chic looking office photovoltaics

beanangel, Feb 27 2009

university reachable Pawel Wargocki David Wyon October 2006 AHSRAE Journal link http://web.ebscohos...05b%40sessionmgr108
one review says The research was sponsored by TC 2.1, Physiology and Human Environment. It indicates that increasing the rates from 6.4 to 20.1 cfm (3 to 9 L/s) could improvestudent performance by 8-14%. It says that modestly lowering the temperature could improve performance by 2-4%. It does not assume any benefit from a possible decrease in disease transmission and absenteeism Note: The magnitude ofthe effects on the performance of schoolwork is larger than was found for the performance of office work 'by adults [beanangel, Feb 27 2009]

Picture of a cubicle http://flickr.com/p...y/25074192/sizes/o/
I note that from viewing pictures there are a wide variety of cubicles some of the cheaper ones look well ventilated as they are [beanangel, Feb 27 2009]

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       Possibly, possibly. There are probably quite a few things that could be done to improve productivity, but they may not be desirable. There was a time when i had to see people more times than i do now in order to sort out their problems. After a while, i improved, with the result that i got people's problems resolved more quickly but didn't have proportionately more clients. The result was that my income fell dramatically.
Applying that reasoning to a large employer, improved productivity means fewer workers and people being laid off. This is because the way of the world is irrational.
  

       I abstain, mainly because whereas you may be right, i can't decide whether it would be a good thing or not. That would depend on how feasible it is to change the world.
nineteenthly, Feb 27 2009
  

       In other words, they're not slaves 'till you stuff them in the ship.
Spacecoyote, Feb 27 2009
  

       Could students do maths even better in a wind tunnel then?
Ian Tindale, Feb 27 2009
  

       //14 pt// So, they just write a little bit larger?
AbsintheWithoutLeave, Feb 27 2009
  

       OMG! Poor air quality really does distract students! Quick to the HVAC truck Batman! Holy underdrive pulleys Robin, these vents are barely blowing at all! Thank goodness we have arrived in time to save these innocents from their own toxic sweat and flatulence!
WcW, Feb 28 2009
  

       What do you mean by an actual invention? Here's an actual fishbone (or at least, a representation of one)
simonj, Feb 28 2009
  
      
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