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Building on water

Why not build on the lakes, rivers and seas if land is becoming scarce.
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I have been toying with the idea of developing megacities on our lakes and water-ways.

Imagine having a bedroom with a glass wall, through which you can see the fishes swimming around. With this submerged apartments, there may not be high need for winter heating and also Summer heat would not be such a big issue.

I envision tunnels with giant escalators connecting the different cities and 'roads/highways' for speed 'water-capsules' using high powered water jets.

Of course there would be no fosil fuel use in this environment. Its either water-energy,solar energy drawn from above or steam from some source/installations on the numerous roof tops doting the 'water-scape'.

Beautiful, is it not?

torontoGeek, Sep 29 2002

Sea City http://www.aiai.ed..../~bat/sea-city.html
One such proposal. This is from 1971. [waugsqueke, Sep 29 2002]

Nexus http://www.tdrinc.com/nexus.html
Both of these would be at great risk from tropical storms. [waugsqueke, Sep 29 2002]

(??) Well baked http://www.canoe.ca...A/seattle_9908.html
Land isn't nearly as scarce as water that is well suited for housing. [Worldgineer, Oct 04 2004]

[link]






       This is baked. I'll find a link here eventually.   

       ("Beautiful, is it not?" is a classic example of the Canadian negative question. Other examples include "You don't know what time it is, do you?" or "You couldn't do me a favor, could you?")
waugsqueke, Sep 29 2002
  

       How deep would this be? Have you considered air and pressure (although the latter would be pretty easy to address)?
NickTheGreat, Sep 29 2002
  

       waugs: You really have to appreciate that the Canadian Negative Question is really a way of stating your point without seeming to be the authority. It truly is a subtle art, isn't it?
[ sctld ], Sep 29 2002
  

       Canadians are rather wonderful, are they not?
po, Sep 29 2002
  

       I feel they are very Canadian, if i'm not mistaken?
[ sctld ], Sep 29 2002
  

       dry?
po, Sep 29 2002
  

       scuttled, absolutely it's subtle. It's all about the lowering of self value, a mastered art.
waugsqueke, Sep 29 2002
  

       Not only Baked, surely, but Widely Baked. Mexico City, London, New York, Tokyo all famously contain sections that were previously water. Any road in New York called "something Slip" is a former pier where the water was filled in. Practically the entire country of Holland is reclaimed from the North Sea (well, I exagerate). The Venetians have been doing this since the fall of Rome, although I think their experience shows the obvious pitfalls of the approach.   

       Even in terms of building on water without landfill, both sides of the Hudson sport buildings built on piles over the river.   

       Of course, all of these metropolises rely heavily on fossil fuel.
DrCurry, Sep 30 2002
  

       Surely they coul float, displacing an equal volume? The could be "tied" to land for stability.
git, Jun 29 2003
  

       What happens when sombody crashes their sub into the side of the city?
Gulherme, Jun 29 2003
  

       Reminds me of the Ant Farm's "Dophin Embassy" project. If you have a chance, catch the travelling exhibition (now in Berkeley, next in Santa Monica, CA.) Big inflables, floating towns, slogans, tail fins.
jutta, Apr 13 2004
  

       Land on earth isn't so rare - there are huge sections of tundra, desert, even temperate regions in the praries of Canada, for example, that are largely uninhabited. However, the problem is with -good- real estate, close to major city centres.   

       Fresh water, however, is much more precious than real estate
alc, Apr 13 2004
  
      
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