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Cat Caterers

Cats as kitchen help for catering companies
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In an annotation to the idea "ingredients.com," someone claimed that cats made good satay kababs. While my cats do not know how to prepare this particular dish, they do take a great interest whenever I'm cooking, and I'm sure that, being intelligent beasts, they could be trained.

Provided that they could be prevented from eating the ingredients for the kebabs instead of cooking them, cats would make excellent kitchen help for a caterer. Cats are alway punctual for anything involving food, and since they are not legal persons, they wouldn't have to be paid minimum wage. Also, they would keep mice away from the kitchen.

Magpie, Dec 04 2004

More extraordinary cats http://www.past-tim...bcrumb=Home|Search|
[harderthanjesus, Dec 05 2004]

Cat Chef http://www.cafepres...m/caterdash.6344397
Cooks wonderful Mice-A-Roni. [jurist, Dec 05 2004]

Magpie's Link http://home.earthli...hapero/FishTale.htm
[jurist, Dec 05 2004]

[link]






       Actually, the anno said "Try a cat. Makes great satay kebabs . . . " rather than saying that cats make good satay kebabs. Pretty different meaning.   

       The skills required for a cat to master even the simplest cooking and knife work needed for satay preparation is likely well beyond the most optimistic expectations for feline intelligence.
bristolz, Dec 04 2004
  

       What's a kebob?
wagster, Dec 04 2004
  

       A satay kebob is usually small morsels of marinated or sauced meat grilled on and eaten from a small bamboo skewer. Other kebobs can have skewered fruits and vegetables as well as meats.   

       Variants: kebab, kabob, shish kabob.
bristolz, Dec 04 2004
  

       Bristolz, the misreading was intentional. Neither JennyUSP (the creator of ingredients.com) nor I would ever dream of making a kebab out of a cat, and I was giving the annotator the benefit of the doubt.   

       As far as cats being able to master the art of cooking, see:   

       http://home.earthlink.net/ ~kayshapero/FishTale.htm   

       They might have to be special cats, but they'd still be cats.
Magpie, Dec 04 2004
  

       I feel that if one were able to teach cats to cook, they would most likely lose interest, and begin play with the cooking tools. After some play, naptime arrives. Any cat activity begins and ends with a nap.
Aegir, Dec 05 2004
  

       your link does not work, Magpie.
po, Dec 05 2004
  

       There's an extra space between "earthlink.net/" and "~kayshapero/" which causes the address to be inaccessible if directly copied and pasted to your browser. You can make the adjustment manually, if you really want to read it, but it is not readily apparent which pages of the site [Magpie] thought were pertinent to the Cat Cook comments.
jurist, Dec 05 2004
  

       I have purchased a small tin of mint imperials for my sister as a yuletide trinket that clearly depicts cats in Victorian dress cooking and preparing a complex meal quite capably. I couldn't find it on the site though so I just linked a historical document on felines. I assume it's accurate.
harderthanjesus, Dec 05 2004
  

       //if you really want to read it// nah, reading between your lines...
po, Dec 05 2004
  

       [later: link added for Magpie, in the spirit of the Season]
jurist, Dec 05 2004
  

       salt and pepper?
po, Dec 05 2004
  

       Re: Magpie's link. To stop a queen cat from 'calling' (ie making a bloody racket cos they are feeling horny) as described in the first story, cat breeders 'service' them with a q-tip. Unpleasant but true.
Belfry, Dec 05 2004
  
      
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