Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Darwin Cereal

comes in the mail every week for a year
  (+23)(+23)(+23)
(+23)
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You go to a website or call a phone number and pay for a year's worth of cereal all at once, through a subscription-like system.

You give them your address, or the address of someone you know who would be delighted to receive the subscription as a gift... perhaps your nephew or best friend.

Then, each week for a year, the recipient receives a small box of DARWIN CEREAL in the mail. This is a small single-serving box, not a full box. It has funky graphics and neat stuff, with a personalized mailing label.

The first box has cereal shapes of small single-celled organisms. The following week, they appear to be little cluster-like lifeforms. And so on and so on. Around week ten, things get interesting... the shapes are more like fish now, and by week 20, amphian-like creatures. Week 30, little rodent-like mammals. Week 40, tree-living marsupial-like mammals. Week 50, apes. Week 52, humanity!

The series of cereals wouldn't necessarily have to be the human evolution... they could trace the evolution of other modern animals, plants, etc... maybe that's something you pick when you subscribe, or maybe each box has a mix of cereal shapes representing the appropriate evolutionary era.

Each box has educational information on the back to support the cereal shapes inside, so that once you eat your cereal (if you eat it), you still have the box to document your subscription.

It takes a while to get to the end of the subscription, but hey... evolution takes time! Fun, educational, and a little corny, but cool, methinks.

Your thoughts?

napoleonbag, Jun 26 2008

[link]






       I'm sending a box to Mike Huckabee.
shapu, Jun 26 2008
  

       [+] Bakeries could do something similar with a 'Darwin Cookie' range, the cookie being a different shape each week. If customers get bored of eating the cookies, they can just buy a gingerbread man already.   

       It could work as a reward scheme too - buy a cookie each week for 10 weeks and you've evolved sufficiently to win a free cookie.
imaginality, Jun 26 2008
  

       I like this, though from the title it sounded like something to kill stupid people with.
MisterQED, Jun 26 2008
  

       I can see the USian evangelical community countering with a whole lineup of rival cereals: Creation Crispies, Shrove Shreddies, Communion Toast Crunch, Honey Bunches of Oaths, and Sugar Popes, to name a few.
Canuck, Jun 27 2008
  

       [+]   

       "What, Primordial Breakfast Soup again!"   

       "It says here on the packet that in order to give you a sense of scale only the last box contains any discernable creatures."
4whom, Jun 27 2008
  

       The second last box converts into an Ark. [+]
coprocephalous, Jun 27 2008
  

       Oven-hot asteroids can be sent careening into the bowl of serial, sploshing out all manner of creatures onto the side.
zen_tom, Jun 27 2008
  

       Reading the title and the first few paragraphs, I was expecting the recipient to get two random cereals, and to have to respond as to which he prefered. The properties of the 'fittest' cereal would be adapted into two new cereals for the next day/week. Gradually the cereals would 'evolve' into a very good cereal suited to the recipient.   

       But this idea is still pretty cool, for educational purposes.
dbmag9, Jun 27 2008
  

       [z_t] Dammit! Only 10ml of cereal left after I put in over a litre.
coprocephalous, Jun 27 2008
  

       +...to be eaten from a monkey-head bowl...
xandram, Jun 27 2008
  

       Neat idea but where are the dinosaurs? I want to be able to go to work and tell everyone that I had a brontosaurus for breakfast.
DrBob, Jun 27 2008
  

       I think they should swell in milk so that you start with a bowl full of single cell organisms and your last few bites look back at you.   

       Brilliant +, is me thoughts...
blissmiss, Jun 27 2008
  

       If you order "Creationist cereal", you get nothing for a year, then at one minute to midnight on the 365th day, a tall man in white robes and with a big white beard turns up with a bowl of ready made cereal including milk and sugar, and spoon feeds it to you while explaining a set of arbitrary rules and telling you that you'll be severely punished if you don't obey .....
8th of 7, Jun 27 2008
  

       It sounds cruel, making everyone wait to bit the heads off the little animals…
CwP, Jun 27 2008
  

       Heh, there's a snack out here called Goldfish with the slogan...   

       The tasty snack that smiles back...until you bite their heads off.   

       Cracks me up every time, which is disturbing, in a, finger licking sort of way.   

       //spoon feeds it to you while explaining a set of arbitrary rules and telling you that you'll be severely punished if you don't obey//   

       It's the same cereal, except this takes 600 million years, and the beard is darker.
Amos Kito, Jun 28 2008
  

       /If you order "Creationist cereal"/ then it comes in a six-serving pack, surely?
david_scothern, Jun 28 2008
  

       Yes, good, this is bakeable and i'm thinking of doing it with the home ed lot. It's a little like sarcastic fruit salad and Mesozoic meal, two ideas to which the HB hasn't been exposed because they're recipes.
nineteenthly, Jun 28 2008
  

       [+] Yum!
kuupuuluu, Jun 28 2008
  

       // it comes in a six-serving pack //   

       Depends if you have faith or not......... yes, to be strictly accurate, the bloke in the beard would have to turn up on six successive days, with a different bowl of cereal. Obviously, on the seventh day you get no breakfast, because he's resting.
8th of 7, Jun 28 2008
  
      
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