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Desktop Sandcastle Siege

A desktop device that automates the siege and reconstruction of sandcastles
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A thick tray edged with stained wood has on its surface a few centimeters of silty sand from the Mississippi River delta. A glass case encloses the sand and half a meter of air above it.

Panels normally hidden in the base of the tray emerge and push half of the sand to each side of the tray. Two other panels then come out of the base and close like a book's covers around one pile of sand, making a high, thin wall of sand patterned like worn stones with a little ivy. Before these two book-cover panels retract, a third mold on an arm crenellates the wall.

At the other side of the tray, sand from the other pile gets packed into balls and fed into a launcher. The firing can be set to automatic or manual. After a preset time, the siege ends and the wall is rebuilt.

Order Desktop Sandcastle Siege in sets of 10 or more and receive a 16-piece set of walling plates so you can siege famous buildings, corporations, and governments.

Ketchupybread, Feb 06 2009

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       Brilliant idea [+] <linguistic pedant>, but BEsiege when it's a verb.</linguistic pedant><historical pedant>Also, if you smash your way into a place in a relatively short space of time, it's not really a siege, is it? I mean, the word "siege" is a metaphor from "sitting down".</historical pedant>
pertinax, Feb 09 2009
  

       I will buy this under 3 conditions:
1) The launcher must be a trebuchet.
2) The marketing materials must include the phrase 'lay waste'.
3) There's a crab in it.
marklar, Feb 09 2009
  

       Brilliant idea. ([pertinax] I'm wondering whether it wouldn't be better practice to break your faux HTML tags into atomic chunks and nest them, where appropriate - e.g. <pedant><linguistic> ... </linguistic><historical> ... </historical></pedant>)
hippo, Feb 09 2009
  

       [hippo] - in this instance, I'd counsel to describe the subtype of pedantry as unique instances of a pedantry superclass.
e.g. <pedant subtype="linguistic">Yeah but...</pedant> <pedant subtype="historical">Ahh well, actually...</pedant>
  

       I'm never sure when attributes are better than elements - who does? - and while I do normally tend towards the elemental, I think there's more merit in this case in having non-nesting pedantricles.
zen_tom, Feb 09 2009
  

       //The marketing materials must include the phrase 'lay waste'//
Is there such a thing as ordained waste?
coprocephalous, Feb 09 2009
  

       [zen] Yes, I see your point. That's probably the most elegant solution short of spending time doing something a bit more reusable in CSS.
hippo, Feb 09 2009
  

       That's all well and good but it won't parse properly under Pangolin.
MaxwellBuchanan, May 03 2016
  

       I doubt it will parse properly under Precisely, either.
MaxwellBuchanan, May 03 2016
  

       I could write software to continue this if you like.
MaxwellBuchanan, May 03 2016
  
      
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