Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Ask your doctor if the Halfbakery is right for you.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                       

Drawer Load Record Player

Open the drawer, drop the record in, and push buttons for tracks.
  (-2)
(-2)
  [vote for,
against]

Features: Auto-reverse Doesn't have to be on top Track Skip Fast Foward Reverse Play Laser reading mechanism Line Level output Headphone jack with volume control.
Amishman35, Feb 13 2001

Drawer Load Laser playback of LPs http://www.elpj.com/about/
Pricey! [csea, Jun 21 2005]

[link]






       If you read that whole, unbroken paragraph as one feature, it's really funny.
centauri, Feb 13 2001
  

       Am I missing something? Do they even make records anymore? To combat the problem with having so many records (45s) when the switch to CDs occurred...I bought myself a jukebox where I now store my 45s. Of course, this didn't help the fact that I have over 500 albums. What I'd really like is a promise that CDs will not be replaced by something new before I die...then I would start buying more.
Susen, Feb 13 2001
  

       I seem to remember that there were car record players that worked something like this but only on singles. How they coped with bumps I'm not sure.
Gordon Comstock, Feb 13 2001
  

       //I seem to remember that there were car record players that worked something like this but only on singles. How they coped with bumps I'm not sure.//   

       The key would be to have everything very well balanced, and to have the record held flat against the turntable. It shouldn't be too hard to design mountings that would make this work very well in almost any conditions. A related feature I'd include would be to have the player apply slight inward pressure on the needle so that in case of a bad groove the player would skip ahead rather than backward, since the latter could cause a bad spot to get played over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over.
supercat, Feb 14 2001
  

       The car record players actually hung upside down in the car, on foam rubber and spring mountings. Someone was talking about restoring one in the newsgroup rec.antiques.radio+phono a while back...   

       I doubt that the DVD will replace the CD for a long time, if ever, because there is so incredibly much more space to fill on a DVD. A CD is 650 megs, more or less, and a DVD is something like 4 or 5 gigs, more for the double-layer ones. You can put in interviews and videos and so on, but are people going to want that for stuff they're going to play in a car?
StarChaser, Feb 16 2001
  

       I knew someone who had a draw-loading record player about 15 years ago. It was really classy - one of those midi systems made to look like separate components, but actually one big cheapo box; it also had "linear tracking" to make your records sound worse, and the draw-loading mechanism took an age to travel in and out. Made by Amstrad if I remember correctly, who then went on to make clunky PCs.
hippo, Feb 16 2001
  

       Not everybody has floppy drives anymore...the iFruity Pebbles don't come with one standard...or didn't, that may have changed.   

       CD's are cheap, pennies to produce if that. DVD's are more expensive because they're often doublesided, and in some cases double-layered. There might be a market for home-made DVD music <ten hours or more of music on one disk...whoo!> but while I do agree it will eventually happen, I doubt artists will start putting ten hours of music on one DVD for the equivalent price of an hour or so of CD music. Either prices will go way up, or things will majorly change. I had an idea long ago of custom CD's from a record store. You tell the machine what you want, what order, artist, song, etc and it burns it into a CD for you right there, paying royalties by the song. Very half-baked at the time, but apparently something that might happen to Napster, without the CD, now...
StarChaser, Feb 18 2001
  

       I think mostly these days the only people left using turntables are hard-core DJs, like myself, but we're using 12" 33 1/3rpm records..   

       But when it comes to DVD Audio, I wouldn't say like 50 hours of music on one dvd.. I'm thinking more like 5 hours of super-high quality. Though CDs are "high" quality, I personally find them to sound like *crap* sometimes.. CD audio is written at about 144kb/s (If I remember right), at 44 khz.. why not make DVD audio disks about 10x the bitrate, and at _LEAST_ 96 khz..   

       Like seriously, audio quality hasn't grown alot in the last few years and its quite annoying, it would just be interesting to have I'd say.
eidolon, Apr 30 2001
  

       //If you read that whole, unbroken paragraph as one feature, it's really funny. centauri, Feb 13 2001//
My immediate thoughts exactly.
thumbwax, Dec 08 2001
  

       if you want to be able to play phonograph records, casette tapes, cds, and a radio, get one of those old fashioned looking all-in-one machines. we got one at kmart. it even plays the 78s.   

       but no 8 track.
-wess, Jun 21 2005
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle