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Dynamic Stageplay

"Or not to be..." He said, rising with a crescendo, slowing to andante, and holding a trill on "be".
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A problem I see in scripts and screenplays is that, often, they account for dialogue, perhaps a few proprietary gestures, and not much else. Timbre of the voice and delivery is up to the actor and director. As a writer, it would be good to convey your own ideas in the script, when it comes to volume, pitch, etc.

So why not use aspects of musical notation in scripts? Not pitch (this ain't no opera) but dynamics and tempo. For example, phrases could have crescendos under them, raising the character's voice to forte... and then a decrescendo, paired with a ritardando, as the dialogue reaches a tender moment.

DrWorm, Jan 14 2010

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       // why not use aspects of musical notation in scripts? //   

       Because actor's tiny branes wouldn't be able to cope, and they would trip over their feet and forget the words even more often than usual.
8th of 7, Jan 14 2010
  

       [-] I've seen scripts with directions like that: similar to stage direction. Useful when the actor hasn't enough prep time with the script.
FlyingToaster, Jan 14 2010
  

       Yes, but have you seen scripts with this exact application of musical notation, something which all actors should know (in my opinion, at least)?
DrWorm, Jan 14 2010
  

       Why would you require actors to understand musical notation ? that's like requiring all instruction booklets to be printed in Chinese: what's the point unless you're actually Chinese.
FlyingToaster, Jan 14 2010
  

       For the same reason that most professional singers know at least a few chords on the guitar; it's useful to be able to read music if you're in the performing arts.
DrWorm, Jan 14 2010
  

       Most directors leave their leads to their own devices: *they* make the decisions as to that kind of expression.
FlyingToaster, Jan 14 2010
  

       Actors would hate this, and except in rare cases, so would directors. THEY are the ones who should be working out the fine points of delivery, not writers.
Jim Bob of Merriam Park, Jan 14 2010
  

       I think that is the job of the director. The movie is the director's interpretation. Maybe the director could take a script and insert his directions. Then he wouldn't have to talk. It could be a whole new kind of directorship.
I'mGoingtoMarryJackWhite, Jan 15 2010
  

       so then the director would need a wand like a music conductor, but the actors couldn't really watch him, so then, I think that's why actor's take on the part, the feeling and mood, so they can do this *naturally*. that's usually what makes a good actor...
xandram, Jan 15 2010
  

       Bunning this bigtime. As much as other people butcher scripts and direction, at least the original intent will be recorded. Should another Shakespeare come along and we wonder "I wonder how he would want it delivered", we'd know. Alas poor theatrical production, I fear that today we have a result cobbled together by many of amateur status. Rare you get something that excludes a low common denominator. Maybe there is also something for the director to record his desires despite unfortunate casting.
bigsleep, Jan 15 2010
  
      
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