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Electrical Engineer Boots

No electricity required
  (+9, -1)(+9, -1)
(+9, -1)
  [vote for,

Okay, this doesn't have a lot to do with electrical engineers, except that one came up with the idea. But "engineer boots" don't actually have much to do with engineers in general, either. What does make these boots Electrical Engineer's?


Rather than being glued on, or stiched on, the soles are held on with strategic application of wireties. There's an inner sole to protect the foot, maintain waterproofness, and provide anchor points; then an outer sole, to provide traction, which is expected to wear down. A set of wireties around the edge, and perhaps a few carefully placed in the middle of the sole, attach the outer sole to the rest of the boot.

When the sole wears down, don't go to the expense of haivng it professionally re-soled. Just clip the wireties, remove the sole, buy a fresh set, and reattach it yourself with more wireties.

You can also change out the sole for the winter, or modify the height of the boot, at will.

gisho, Oct 28 2010

these http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_tie
[afinehowdoyoudo, Oct 28 2010]


       What, no duct-tape?!
Jinbish, Oct 28 2010

       Er, only if the sole manufactuer felt like gouging people, [21 Quest]. No labor cost. Professional resoling of a nice shoe runs about $50-60; we're not looking at $50 worth of rubber here.
gisho, Oct 28 2010

       I’ve always thought that shoes and boots should be modular. Often one part needs replacing or mending while the other parts are all fine.   

       A proper electrical engineers cobblers would fit a full set of pressure, force, temperature, humidity, light and heat sensors, along with a 9DOF IMU in each foot, and GPS. Then all the constituent modules of the shoe can be connected together, using CAN. A shoegazing display on each foot would indicate status and useless information.   

       For proper wearable robotics, the shoes should have actuators in the soles to anticipate flexure, and variable stodginess in the heel and toe areas, for walking running and dancing. Vibe motors on each toe can surreptitiously count to ten bits, or on a coarser level, indicate front left right or behind. The sensors and processing should all be powered using energy harvesting, stealing the flexure energy from the foot. And some heat.
Ian Tindale, Oct 28 2010

       Ahh, zap straps. Part of any decent rough'n it kit.   

       I imagined these would be part of every well-dressed Tube* Engineer's attire - and were a pair of boots with a volt meter on the top, so the wearer would know when they're standing on the Live (3rd) Rail. (The other indications being flung 30 feet way, smoke, heat, pain and death)   

       Imagine my surprise when I was totally wrong about this idea.   

       (*Tube = London's Underground Train Network)
Dub, Oct 30 2010

       <Ian Tindale> "variable stodginess in the heel and toe areas, for walking running and dancing"   

       Have you ever seen engineers dance? anything which might improve engineers dancing is to be applauded.   

       I like the modular concept - as technology progresses we can upgrade to hover-soles.   

Twizz, Nov 02 2010

       //anything which might improve engineers dancing is to be applauded//   

       3rd rail. (See [Dub]'s comment)
Jinbish, Nov 02 2010

       Maybe use velcro, like roofers, but find idea anyway. +
nomocrow, Nov 04 2010


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