Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Extreme starching

An easier way to cut clothes accurately
  (+10, -3)
(+10, -3)
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Attempting to cut fabric which is in the same floppy state in which it is intended to be worn is quite difficult. This could be remedied by soaking the fabric in a water-soluble stiffening agent, probably starch, until it is as stiff as a board. It could then be easily and accurately cut by a knife, scissors or maybe a chainsaw and perhaps also sewn before being soaked once again in water to dissolve the starch. It would be much easier for inept people such as myself to make clothes then.
nineteenthly, Aug 24 2005

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       Wet it out and dip it in liquid nitrogen.
ldischler, Aug 24 2005
  

       I like the idea of dry ice-type steam rising from the sewing machine, along with sparks flying from the sawmill-type apparatus used for cutting.
nineteenthly, Aug 24 2005
  

       Croissant, if only for conjuring the mental image of the sewing bee going at it with chainsaws.
DrCurry, Aug 24 2005
  

       Fabric would be sold in stacks, like lumber.
Worldgineer, Aug 24 2005
  

       I had a feeling there might be a better technique than that industrially, but at home water jets would be impractical.
nineteenthly, Aug 25 2005
  

       Yes!
bungston, Aug 25 2005
  
      
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