Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
h a l f b a k e r y
Tip your server.

idea: add, search, annotate, link, view, overview, recent, by name, random

meta: news, help, about, links, report a problem

account: browse anonymously, or get an account and write.

user:
pass:
register,


                         

Farming ridable millipedes

Pet and food alternative
  (+2, -1)
(+2, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Some time in the prehistoric past when the oxygen level on earth was far greater we had giant insects roaming about. These puppies were measured in feet not inches and were big enough for a kid to ride. Insects are nutritious and grow quickly + the biosphere project was a bust = more fun food for all. Lets fill the biosphere project with a higher level of oxygen and select generations of insects for increasing size and nutritional value (though in our society shape and color will predominate). Filet of grasshopper anyone. Makes a great Christmas pet (in oxygen enriched aquarium), if it gets out it makes a great meal. Note that if a millipede loses a leg it can grow a replacement, try that with a cow!
Widgit, Apr 11 2005

Future 4H blue ribbon winner. http://i.cnn.net/cn...rt.millipede.ap.jpg
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Apr 11 2005]

The future is now http://encarta.msn....ticle=scienceeatbug
Some people already eat bugs. [whippinggas, Apr 11 2005]

FossilBugz - a Yahoo Group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FossilBugz/
that I'm a member of. It's aimed primarily at the younger end of the education spectrum, and is also associated (by the group owners) with a more scholarly grown-up version of the same topic. [Ian Tindale, Apr 11 2005]

Ancient Centipede 1' wide, 5' long http://news.nationa...112_TVbigroach.html
[Widgit, Apr 11 2005]

Insect respiration http://www.cals.ncs...torial/respire.html
[Widgit, Apr 11 2005]

Meganeura - Giant gragonfly http://home.att.net...dridge/megneura.htm
Interesting info [Widgit, Apr 11 2005]

[link]






       //Makes a great Christmas pet // <obligatory> A giant millipede is not just for Christmas - with luck, you'll have enough for a curry on Boxing Day.
AbsintheWithoutLeave, Apr 11 2005
  

       //we had giant insects roaming about. These puppies were measured in feet// ? ? ? Love to see a link on that.   

       Are you talking about ancient marine arthropods? Because the coconut crab is about the limit for arthropod size on land.
ConsulFlaminicus, Apr 11 2005
  

       It's true (within limits, and not sure it's related to oxygenation). A lot of the paleogeoarthropoda can generally exceed the average size of contemporary geoarthropoda. For an example I'm sure we're all familiar with in the back of most of our minds, the Odonata family exhibited some pretty darn huge dragonflies, around the time of the carboniferous period. Dragonflies that were already an extremely advanced form of insect, very highly evolved and diverse. All this was happening long before anyone had ever thought of inventing dinosaurs.
Ian Tindale, Apr 11 2005
  

       As a kid I recall an exhibit at the museum of prehistoric forest. The giant millipede stuck in my mind as it was large enough for me to ride. Somewhere else I read that the higher oxygen levels allowed larger insect life. Not sure if true but does make some sense as insects intake oxygen through valve opens in their exoskeleton which then passively diffuses through their body tracheal tubes (see link). If the oxygen was higher then it could fget further down these passages before being depleted.   

       "The strip coal mine has also yielded fossils of two rare arachnids, a giant centipede-like insect measuring about 60 inches long (150 centimeters) and 12 inches wide (30 centimeters), and a new genus and species of gerarid insect. " (see link)   

       Meganeura (giant dragonfly) which lived more than 280 million years ago in the forest swamps and said to have a wing span of more than 27 inches. (see link)
Widgit, Apr 11 2005
  

       [widgit] But when you squash things for millions of years, don't they grow flatter and larger, like a cartoon cat through a mangle? Who's to say these weren't just itty-bitty, ordinary millipedes/dragonflies?
AbsintheWithoutLeave, Apr 11 2005
  

       Widgit, - good point about the respiration, but not all insects were uniformly larger. There was a greater biodiversity among insects back in the day, including another two (I think?) whole families of insects that we no longer have today (all the remaining seven or so distinct insect families we have today were evident during the span from carboniferous to cretaceous, generally). Then, there were small insects just as we have today, as well as larger insects, just as we don't have today.
Ian Tindale, Apr 11 2005
  
      
[annotate]
  


 

back: main index

business  computer  culture  fashion  food  halfbakery  home  other  product  public  science  sport  vehicle