Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Faucet Thermometer

Know your water temperature
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Simply a kitchen faucet with a thermometer sticking out of it. The thermally sensitive part of the thermometer is in contact with the water stream, and the visible part sticks out the top. This allows you to know if your water is at the correct temperature for clean dishes.

Acceptable temperature range should be labeled, along with temperature.

Worldgineer, Jan 16 2004

Thermochromic Dinner Service http://www.halfbake..._20Dinner_20Service
Idea inspired by (ok, completely plundered from) [jon]. [Worldgineer, Oct 05 2004, last modified Oct 17 2004]

Floating Thermometer http://shop.store.y...dpets/thteflth.html
Another (though less elegant) solution. [Worldgineer, Oct 05 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

Faucet Friend http://www.udeducat...h/student/floyd.asp
The “Faucet Friend” is a simple water temperature safety device that changes color and is attached to the end of a faucet. [waugsqueke, Oct 05 2004, last modified Oct 21 2004]

Similar idea, beautiful implementation http://www.equasystem.com/eng/index.htm
[Worldgineer, Jun 16 2006]

[link]






       [worldgineer] glad to inspire!+
jonthegeologist, Jan 16 2004
  

       Have it as an LCD display on the sink rim, powered by the flow of water through the tap.
silverstormer, Jan 16 2004
  

       // correct temperature for clean dishes //   

       Or for non-burned hands. Truly excellent. +
phundug, Jan 16 2004
  

       what phundug said.   

       I imagine that hot water for washing-up is efficient as it dissolves fat more easily and thus convenient. If it were a hygiene requirement it would have to be at boiling point to destroy germs.
po, Jan 16 2004
  

       [jon]'s link said between 50°C and 60°C is a good range. Sure boiling is probably better, but do you really boil your dishes?
Worldgineer, Jan 16 2004
  

       Gromit, so glad to see you here again!
po, Jan 16 2004
  

       It takes thermometers a bit of time to register correct temps if I'm not mistaken. That's a lot of running water.
k_sra, Jan 16 2004
  

       Automatic digital shower controlers preform a similar action. But they regulate the temperature of the water as well ... just bake into your kitchen sink, and you're all set!
Letsbuildafort, Jan 16 2004
  

       [k] It's related to the mass of the fluid in the thermometer and the conductivity of the glass and fluid. Make it a small thermometer, and it may have a fast enough response time. If not, we can always go with a thermocouple - they have very little mass and are nicely conductive (no glass), so have a very fast response time.
Worldgineer, Jan 16 2004
  

       I like this idea for children's safety---not getting the water too hot or cold for little hands and feet. Call the patent office, [Worldgineer].
rogerdna, Jan 16 2004
  

       Agree with fort... I'd call this more or less baked by digital temp shower faucets. It makes sense that if you want to know the temperature, you'd certainly want to control it as well. So I'd eschew this in favour of going right to a digital kitchen tap.
waugsqueke, Jan 16 2004
  

       Great link, [waugs]. This is exactly what I had first imagined during my comment in [jon]'s idea. I think they'll have response time problems unless they thermally insulate it from the faucet, and even then make sure it's made out of something nicely thermally conductive (I'd go with copper). Other than that, it seems very viable.
Worldgineer, Jan 16 2004
  

       This would also be a big help for activating yeast.
1st2know, Jan 16 2004
  

       Do I sense a homebrewer ?
normzone, Jan 16 2004
  

       //activating yeast// why??
babyhawk, Jan 16 2004
  

       Similar widely used in darkroom sinks for knowing and setting water temperature, back when people used darkrooms for film developing.   

       Another similar device (offered as food for thought, no opinion as to redundancy is presumed) :   

       Our hot water heater has a controller at the kitchen sink (mounted on the wall behind) that lets me set the hot water temperature between 96 F and 140 F. I have to wait for the lag from the new water temp to course through the pipes to the faucet, but that's usually no big deal. I could buy extra controls to install at any faucet in the house, but our house is small, so one is enough. We use it to set a safe temperature for bathing the kids, setting a high temp for dishwashing, and setting the perfect shower temperature.
oxen crossing, Jan 19 2004
  

       An alternative to the "Faucet Thermometer" idea would be to use one of those floating thermometers that are commonly used in hot tubs. I thought up the faucet idea because I hand-wash directly out of the faucet (just two here using dishes, and most everything goes in the dishwasher). However, it occurs to me that most people probably fill the sink with hot water first.
Worldgineer, Jan 20 2004
  
      
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