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Futurepedia or OverBaked

A website that looks to estimate when an Event will occur. 
  (+7)
(+7)
  [vote for,
against]

Asking a question will generate a dedicated page. For example a question might be "when will computers take over the world?"

Events that the question is dependant on can then be tied to this such as "when will computers become aware?".

Users can rate the importance of a events making those with high scores critical, others important and low scoring events not important. The max date of the critical events would then be the answer to the question.

Each Event page would have a dedicated forum and the ability to add supporting information through links. 

Users would gain points for rating events and those with high scores could become editors to help manage the sites content. 

Aqua Guy, Sep 18 2011

Future technology prediction http://www.techcast.org/
[nickthird, Sep 21 2011]

Prediction Games http://en.wikipedia...iki/Prediction_game
[swimswim, Sep 25 2011]

[link]






       I like it, as it might crowd source the steps necessary for future progress.   

       So under "when will there be flying cars?" you might have "when will there be small light weight high energy flywheels?" to allow for controlled landing after engine failure. Then people who don't know how to make flying cars but do know how to make flywheels might build the tech needed for the next steps and might rethink how flying cars could be made. (+)
MisterQED, Sep 19 2011
  

       It would be interesting to crowdsource and gamble on the results, like the internet voting prediction sites do.   

       "When will mass economic crises lead to a new form of economic warfare" I think would be a good current topic.   

       As to flying cars, never. Not smart enough use of the energy investment required.
RayfordSteele, Sep 19 2011
  

       It could also put all predictions in date order and give a timeline for the future
Aqua Guy, Sep 25 2011
  

       //As to flying cars, never. Not smart enough use of the energy investment required.// I see where you are coming from, but this may not be true. If you take equal vehicles, then it takes WAY less energy to roll them vs. fly them, but that may not be the case. Standard cars need enormous amounts of crash protection, brakes, and suspension which adds lots of weight which wastes fuel. A flying car should only drive at most, short distances at slow speeds, so significant weight savings are possible. Adding in a third dimension would lower congestion, which would also save fuel. Now add in the energy needed to support the infrastructure for all those cars and I think you'd have to admit the energy investment question is not so black and white.
MisterQED, Sep 25 2011
  

       //A flying car should only drive at most, short distances at slow speeds,//   

       In which case, how does a flying car differ from a light aeroplane, most of which have wheels and are quite capable of taxiing around an airfield?
pocmloc, Sep 25 2011
  

       Never is a really long time. Given a really long time of equal length to never, it's possible that there will be flying cars or mass market flying vehicles of some kind. If never means occuring after the several decades that one exists, then yes, never.
rcarty, Sep 25 2011
  

       // In which case, how does a flying car differ from a light aeroplane, most of which have wheels and are quite capable of taxiing around an airfield?// The ability to drive in a standard width car lane and having a drive mechanism that, for better or worse, does not puree nearby pedestrians.
MisterQED, Sep 29 2011
  

       bun for pedestrian extract
Voice, Oct 01 2011
  
      
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