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George W's Axis of Evil

Half a job swap...
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It's always George Bush's axis, as if he was the one in charge. The idea is to put him in charge of a small dictatorship and have him try to manage a pathetic economy, stay in power by killing rivals/rigging elections, negotiate with the UN and stave of serious consequences... The hope is that looking at the problem from the other side may allow a previously unnoticed peaceful solution to be found...

Needless to say, Saddam doesn't get to be the president of the USA...

RobertKidney, Jan 04 2003

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       How is this different from Bush's present regime (apart from the words "small" and, arguably, "dictatorship")?
snarfyguy, Jan 04 2003
  

       Basically he wouldn't have the military or economic power to make other countries do what he wanted... he'd have to try diplomacy or something...
RobertKidney, Jan 05 2003
  

       If GWB hadn't already been governor of Texas and executive in a major oil/gas exploration company, this would seem like an inspired idea. But he's been there and done that. And even though you and I may not care for his style, the administrative work seems to be getting done.
jurist, Jan 05 2003
  

       Perhaps public service exams should be required of elected officals.
LordWatson, Jan 05 2003
  

       No
nizgy16, Jan 05 2003
  

       what can I say, the guy is a moron.
Gulherme, Jan 05 2003
  

       Baked.
landruc, Jan 05 2003
  

       I agree with LordWatson most elected officals need to have some sort of intelligence to do their job proberly. Yes Mr. Bush is a moron and for that matter so is Tony Blair for agreeing to help him. My actual opinions contain words not suitable for this annotation.
talen, Jan 06 2003
  

       Erm, a bit late in the day to be adding this, but an axis is a straight line, so no way to get it to go through Iran, North Korea and Disneyland.
not_morrison_rm, Nov 14 2016
  

       Maybe not ... after all, a satellite in free-fall effectively moves in a "straight" line, and if it was in a polar orbit as the planet rotates below it those places would sucessively come under its track without any course corrections.
8th of 7, Nov 14 2016
  

       If spacetime is curved how does a satellite move in a straight line?
Voice, Nov 14 2016
  

       Why don't you ask one ?
8th of 7, Nov 14 2016
  

       //If spacetime is curved how does a satellite move in a straight line?//   

       Space-time is modelled on rubber sheets so satellites naturally follow the elliptical paths observed when planning orbits on a trampoline. NASA science (needs another statistical analysis) is actually mostly informed by teenagers bouncing over hedges or falling through the fabric of space-time.
bigsleep, Nov 14 2016
  

       That's true, we've seen the videos on YouTube.   

       The ones with the trampolines and the hedges are just as funny, too.
8th of 7, Nov 14 2016
  

       //If spacetime is curved how does a satellite move in a straight line?   

       While to the satellite it might look like a straight line, to everyone else in the universe it's a circle or ellipse or whatever, ergo it can't be an axis.   

       While I'm on the subject less spikey satellites would be good, less chance of tearing the rubber sheet. Doesn't bear thinking about..<shudders>
not_morrison_rm, Nov 14 2016
  
      
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