Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Graduated cakepans

Okay, okay, so it's not a cure for cancer
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A sSilly little idea that came to me the other day after making some (chocolate only) brownies. Without being anal about it, I wanted to cut the brownies into as equally-sized pieces as possible. It occurred to me that cake pans could be built with thin scores in a grid along the bottom and up the sides. The height of the score along the side would indicate the number of pieces in that direction by cutting along all the scores of the same height. Just place the knife tip in the score and draw it through the cake, brownies, fudge, whatever following the score the whole way.
phoenix, Dec 09 2001

Blade' traybake pan http://www.lakeland...ookbake/baking!5859
baked, if you'll pardon the pun, and I understand your description [spinglespangle, Mar 06 2006]

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       Cool idea. Think there is a way that this could be done so that they'd still be easy to clean? I have found that scratches or scoring in a baking dish can make it a challenge to clean and, also, cause it to be hard to get cake out of the pan in one piece (if you were ever using it for something besides brownies).

Hmmm, brownies. . . . I may need to go make some now.
bristolz, Dec 10 2001
  

       It's possible to buy silicone-based muffin trays which are flexible, non-stick, and oven-proof (bakeable).
angel, Dec 10 2001
  

       I thought this was something completely different from the title. I imagined a cake pan that could be scaled to accomodate many different volumes of batter to keep the height of the cake constant.
spew, Dec 10 2001
  

       [spew]: Not a bad idea. I've seen measuring cups like that.   

       [Pertinent Oak], [angel]: It's true that one could use a compartmentalized pan to accomplish the same thing, but rather defeats the point of a multipurpose pan.
phoenix, Dec 10 2001
  

       <<<in awe of people who actually bake>>>   

       are muffin pans multipurpose (other than cupcakes)?
Susen, Dec 10 2001
  

       Susen -
Muffin pans are great for making gift-sized cheesecakes. Also for experimenting with different cheesecake recipes/flavors without ruining an entire batch. Also work for making pot pie thingies that I do sometimes. Also for individual-sized meatloaf. And, turned upside down, a muffin pan works great as a cooling stand for a cake pan.

For the non-bakers, a muffin pan is a great parts bin when disassembling small appliances or carburetors (assuming you have plans for reassembly).
quarterbaker, Dec 10 2001
  

       On another note -- my grandmother, who was an excellent cook and owned a restaurant, had this little thingy. It was a section of a circle, exactly 1/8th of a pie pan size, with a small handle sticking out. It was intended that this would be put in the pie pan before the crust was in place, and would remain under the pie until ready to serve. Cut around this little wedge (easy to feel with a knife) and you have a perfectly sized piece of pie that lifts right out without mess (the first piece of pie often gets mangled when removed).

Anyway, you could do something like that for a cake/brownie pan. Get a couple in different sizes if you want. Make 'em yourself with sheet aluminum.

BTW - have you ever seen Martha Stewart demonstrate the "proper" way to cut angelfood cake? You're supposed to use 2 forks to pull it apart, rather than really cut it (which just mashes it down). And here I've been using my fingers.
quarterbaker, Dec 10 2001
  

       pert oak, you cook it and I'll eat it
po, Dec 10 2001
  

       There should be 'stop' circles on the bottom of skillets and on some bake sheets for pouring batter, but I'm not complaining.
reensure, Dec 10 2001
  

       You can make your own stop circles with a squirt bottle and batter. I use this with pancakes sometimes. I lay down a circle of batter on the skillet, let it set up for a moment and then ladle batter into the middle. I like to put chocolate in the batter for the edge--looks cool. I can draw interesting shapes, or write stuff, like this. I love pancakes.
bristolz, Dec 10 2001
  

       mmmmm chocolate chip cookies :)
jimithing, Dec 10 2001
  

       Think this is baked by the marvellous Lakeland limited - see link
spinglespangle, Mar 06 2006
  
      
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