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Grassohol

You can ferment almost anything.
  (+9, -1)(+9, -1)
(+9, -1)
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Alot of people will buy beer like Molson Canadian or Budweiser because it's cheap and plentiful, right? We figure, what's more plentiful than the grass growing in all our front yards!

People have been making alcoholic drinks for thousands of years out of all kinds of crazy things just to stay drunk. Think of the first guy who tried Vodka; he probably sipped it out of a half-rotten, mouldy potato. Grassohol takes that same genius' concept and makes it easy for all of us to share in the comfort of our own homes.

You have all heard or experienced Rye Whisky before. This concept doesn't stray too far from that, only instead of Rye, Grassohol uses only the finest Kentucky Bluegrass varieties to produce a rich, earthy liqueur that goes down as easy as last Sunday's yard work. So throw away your old, ratty composter and start throwing your lawn clippings into a Grassohol still today!

Ebenzer, Jul 20 2005

Google search for grassohol. http://www.oznet.ks.../pr_apuf/Huhnke.htm
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Jul 20 2005]

(?) Grass Fermentation in a Silage. http://www.blueseal...tation_analysis.htm
[daseva, Jul 20 2005]

EcoMow Harvester http://www.digitalt...ower-runs-on-grass/
a self-navigating, self-powered robotic lawn mower that runs on nothing more than the grass clippings it collects from your yard. [xaviergisz, Jan 30 2014]

Green dragon http://boards.canna...nnabis-alcohol.html
'Baked' in a different sense in accordance with urban slang, as I am sure you know. [bhumphrys, Jan 31 2014]

Sugar cane byproduct femented http://onlinelibrar....260440213/abstract
When sugar cane is fermented, the left over grass part, bagasse, can be turned to sugar and then to alcohol. Bagasse is almost the same as lawn clippings. [popbottle, Feb 03 2014]

[link]






       I heard somewhere that grass produces a toxin when you cut it, but maybe it was just propaganda.
pooduck, Jul 20 2005
  

       I don't think grass has enough usable sugars in it to ferment.
5th Earth, Jul 20 2005
  

       If the purpose of making the grassohol is to power the lawn mower, I heartily endorse the plan.
xaviergisz, Jul 20 2005
  

       I see no reason why this shouldn't work, after all you can ferment wood. I only wonder that no one has done it yet.
wagster, Jul 20 2005
  

       /You can ferment wood/ you can even ferment lichens if you're desperate. Sweden was forced to do this when normal sources of vodka ceased to function.
david_scothern, Jul 20 2005
  

       Zubrowka vodka is flavored with Buffalo Grass.
ldischler, Jul 20 2005
  

       Shown here, grass fermentation can yield almost 1% alcohol. (linky)
daseva, Jul 20 2005
  

       I was going to say it might not taste good, but then I got to thinking, what hard liquor DOES taste good?   

       Just don't have a picture of a dog on the label.
doctorremulac3, Jan 30 2014
  

       Grass is primarily celulose. In addition to the 1% ethanol, you've probably got some methanol, and various other toxins. All at low doses, so it wouldn't hurt cows to eat it, but you'd better be extremely careful with your distallation if you expect a concentrated version to be at all potable.
MechE, Jan 30 2014
  

       [Ebenezer] created an account two days before creating this idea, and then was never heard from again.
normzone, Jan 30 2014
  

       //... never heard from again.//   

       Tragic gardening accident?
bs0u0155, Jan 30 2014
  

       Same issues as with any cellulosic ethanol. Cellulase must be tricky stuff.   

       I wonder what % of the cellulose ingested by ruminants is converted into biologically available sugars?
bungston, Jan 30 2014
  

       What is really surprising is that cellulases are not far more common, especially in higher animals.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 31 2014
  

       Those early humans whose metabolisms yielded cellulase used to eat their own huts during hard winters, and then died of hypothermia. That's my theory, anyway, and I'm sticking to it.
pertinax, Feb 01 2014
  
      
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