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Highly compressed speech transmision

using mechanical larynx.
  (+3, -1)
(+3, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Develop a mechanical equivalent of larynx with mouth, tongue, throat (pipe) etc.

ON the radio station side, transmit only movements of mouth, tongue etc.

At the receiver side: Throat will be just a pipe with variable frequency shutter through which air is pushed by a pump. Pitch of the sound generated will be adjusted by speed of shutter. Opening and closing of mouth along with tongue will control ADSR ( attack, Delay, sustain, release) parameters of the sound generated. By controling things as such, speech can be generated.

Radio receiver will control above mechanical larynx as per signals received from radio station.

This can be used for transmitting news and perhaps also song vocals.

VJW, Dec 26 2010

(?) Voice Codecs http://www.cs.colum...4-speech-coding.pdf
The last couple of slides describe the digital equivalent (some codecs use a pre-built 'codebook' of laryngeal sound) [Jinbish, Dec 26 2010]

Mechanical Voice System http://www.ist.cmu....aper/InTech0305.pdf
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Dec 30 2010]

[link]






       A 10kHz channel will transmit reasonable quality speech, and the mechanical larynx is going to need a LOT of data ... but [+] for a novel concept.
8th of 7, Dec 26 2010
  

       The TMS5220 speech synthesis chip simulates the human vocal tract. However, i think you'd be better off transmitting stuff encoded in the IPA and converting it to audio samples at 't other end.
nineteenthly, Dec 26 2010
  

       Surely a first step would be to get people to speak more concisely?
MaxwellBuchanan, Dec 26 2010
  

       +infctwe[]aldoþis
nineteenthly, Dec 26 2010
  

       Re: Ti TMS5220 chip. One of the guys responsible, Gene Frantz, is very senior at Ti and is an all round very nice chap. He's a visiting Prof at my alma mater. He's a brilliant presenter and motivator and engineer: "Don't tell me it won't run at (x)MHz - that just means no-one else has made it work yet. We'll figure it out..." etc.
Jinbish, Dec 26 2010
  

       Link broken, IPA reference much appreciated. Hop 15 or Wipeout, thank you.
normzone, Dec 26 2010
  

       The link works from where I am... It is a pdf file though.
Can someone else have a quick look at it please?
Jinbish, Dec 26 2010
  

       That's really neat, [Jinbish], surprised he's not retired.
nineteenthly, Dec 26 2010
  

       Yeah - I think he's basically the Ti University liaison type-thingy and all round general guru.
Jinbish, Dec 26 2010
  

       The link works fine for me.
nineteenthly, Dec 26 2010
  

       I guess in either case, TMS5220 or mechainical larynix, a bandwidth of 20 hz might be sufficient to transmit the speech.
VJW, Jan 21 2011
  

       I like this a lot, especially if it is made of brass and vulcanized rubber and the year is 1910. The member of the steampunk hero team using it is the last of a race of superintelligent chimps. He plays it like a saxophone, to which it bears a resemblance. He also wears a tiny red hat, because he thinks it is hilarious.
bungston, Jan 21 2011
  
      
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