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Hill Traction for Front-Wheel Drive

Slidy... in a good way
 
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Heavy weight on a rail attached to the underside of a vehicle. Normally, the weight is stowed near the vehicle's natural center of mass, so as not to negatively effect handling. When an electronic level detects that the vehicle is climbing a hill, the weight slides forward to offset the loss of traction on the drive tires. Useful for driving in extremely wet and/or icy conditions, I'm not talking about your average +/- 15 degree inclines. I'm talking the big hills, like 30 degrees or more. During dry/warm seasons, the kit can be easily disconnected and stored in your garage.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013

Centrifugal tires http://www.halfbake...fugal-center_20Tire
Use these for extra grip, but with teeth in the center spokes [Brian the Painter, Jan 11 2013]

[link]






       Why not just pump water, or even fuel, between ballast tanks? When not required, drain tanks.
  

       Ships and aircraft adjust their trim by such methods.
  

       Finding space for two 50 litre polypropylene tanks in the front of the vehicle might be tricky - possibly, they would fit behind the bumper (fender).
8th of 7, Jan 08 2013
  

       Most likely the amount of weight necessary would have a deleterious effect on braking, especially going downhill, but bun regardless.
ytk, Jan 08 2013
  

       The added weight helps studded tires bite into packed snow and ice. When going downhill, shift the weight back to center of mass and it should aid in the braking process, I think. Thanks for the bun.
  

       8th, that would be a good idea, but would require modification of the vehicle. The idea behind my post is that it's a kit that can be installed on just about any vehicle with just a few bolts/clamps.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013
  

       The additional traction provided by the added weight isn't going to help braking enough to offset the extra amount of work the brakes and tires have to do in order to slow you down, particularly in icy conditions.
ytk, Jan 08 2013
  

       Any weight you add to a vehicle affects handling. Primary ride, for instance, would suffer at one end of the vehicle or the other by moving the weight around.
RayfordSteele, Jan 08 2013
  

       Shift into a lower gear, pump the brakes a little, you'll be fine. And yes, D.U. would be awesome for this.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013
  

       Take it from the vehicle architecture engineer. Weight is what we do.
RayfordSteele, Jan 08 2013
  

       I used to switch back and forth between left and right fuel tanks on my 1971 Ford F250 truck, just for grins, to keep it trimmed.
  

       Once you open that hornets nest of vehicle modification, it's all fair game.
  

       But this idea is too simple. Why not move the passenger compartment and controls forwards and back in response to changing parameters? And with all the computer sensors available, after [21] has had lunch it should shift ever so slightly again.
normzone, Jan 08 2013
  

       There's a reason folks in northern locales tend to load the beds of their pickups with sandbags during winter, Ray.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013
  

       That has to do with traction, not handling or braking, both of which will be negatively affected by the extra weight of the sandbags.
ytk, Jan 08 2013
  

       Set the entire body of the vehicle on 4 arms that start parallel to the ground pointing back Then when traction is needed, they rotate and lift the vehicle up and fwd. Make some side to side pivots in case you need to do a little sprint car driving.
Brian the Painter, Jan 08 2013
  

       You can't steer or stop at all if you don't have traction because your vehicle is too lightweight to push the studs into the ice. Any steering/breaking success is better than the utter failure to achieve either one which is experienced without the added weight. Perhaps if architectural engineers designed vehicles with that fact in mind, folks wouldn't have to resort to such measures. I drive a Dodge Grand Caravan for work, this ain't some little Fiat.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013
  

       I could have uses this at work today. We got snow stomped big time. All was well upon arrival, but at the end of the day my truck was under half a foot of super slippery snow and my job site was at the bottom of a long hill. It took my half an hour to travel one kilometer. (and a quarter tank of gas) There is just no substitute for 4wd which is seized on my truck, but when it worked it worked well.
Brian the Painter, Jan 08 2013
  

       One day there will be auto-gyroscopic precession stabilization/traction control for vehicles.
  

       Oh yes, it will happen.   

       2 fries you better crack a smile, them there arr fightin' words!
Brian the Painter, Jan 08 2013
  

       That won't keep it from happening...   

       Brian, that's what happened to us yesterday. Spinning your wheels trying in vain to get up a slippery slope will indeed burn through fuel like nothing else.
21 Quest, Jan 08 2013
  

       Oh no not in vain at all! Once my ice tires ripped away the overburden the gravel/pavement was exposed and some smoke helped propel me(at 45 degrees) straight up the hill. It was so loud and for so long that neighbours came out to watch/laugh/high five. It was Epic. Also my brother wasn't sure if this was actually happening and still hasn't said a word about it.
Brian the Painter, Jan 09 2013
  

       That is sheer brilliance. Truly a lightbulb moment if ever I saw one.
21 Quest, Jan 09 2013
  

       //You can't steer or stop at all if you don't have traction because your vehicle is too lightweight to push the studs into the ice. Any steering/breaking success is better than the utter failure to achieve either one which is experienced without the added weight. Perhaps if architectural engineers designed vehicles with that fact in mind, folks wouldn't have to resort to such measures. //
  

       So, your answer is to reduce fuel economy and destroy handling all year by wanting more weight permanently installed on the vehicle for the benefit of a month or two of more traction?
  

       //I drive a Dodge Grand Caravan for work, this ain't some little Fiat.//
  

       If I drove either one of those I wouldn't admit to it. Anway, physics demands compromise, and the fuel economy penalty isn't worth it. Otherwise I'd love if if it came with wings as well. If you need more traction, invest in some snow tires, chains, get an awd or simply add some weight.
RayfordSteele, Jan 09 2013
  

       I remember some boys adventure story from the 40s where they struggled to get up a hill, and the tech genius in the gang suggested reversing up instead. The explanation offered was that low gear was lower than 1st. This would also have been a RWD car I assume.
pocmloc, Jan 09 2013
  

       // all year by wanting more weight permanently installed on the vehicle for the benefit of a month or two of more traction?//
  

       I refer you to the last sentence of my post, and also the last sentence in my first annotation. I thought I was pretty clear that this is not a permanent installation.
  

       //or simply add some weight//
  

       That's the whole idea that YOU keep criticising, ya jackass.
21 Quest, Jan 09 2013
  

       I promise you reversinguphill in a rear wheel is the most futile event of my life. Reversing uphill in a front wheel drive transfers all the engines weight over the tires and lots of the rears weight as well. Works like a charm.
Brian the Painter, Jan 09 2013
  

       Maybe a set of jet engines might help.
Brian the Painter, Jan 09 2013
  

       Sorry, I tend to skim when I read some ideas, I did miss the detachable bit.
RayfordSteele, Jan 10 2013
  

       It's nothing we haven't all done.
21 Quest, Jan 10 2013
  

       Rayford is a pretty nice guy, for a pilot.
Brian the Painter, Jan 10 2013
  

       Pfft... aircrew...
21 Quest, Jan 10 2013
  

       I would wonder about ground clearance - most FWD cars these days are ridiculously low. Would the thingy drag in the snow?
afinehowdoyoudo, Jan 10 2013
  

       It could be in the form of a snow plow.
Kansan101, Jan 11 2013
  

       We do fight for every millimeter.
RayfordSteele, Jan 11 2013
  

       In their assult on the Point d'Hoc in 1944, the US Rangers deployed a device developed by D.M.W.D. called the Rocket Grapnel.
  

       This was, unsurprisingly, a rocket attached to a grapnel hook and trailing a climbing rope. It did come as something of a surprise to the Germans; who in turn had developed a system for mounting 21cm Nebelwerfer launchers on the sides of vehicles for short range bombardment.
  

       If a vehicle had rocket grapnel launchers mounted on the sides, and a facility for attaching the traling line to a front-mounted winch drum, then it could haul itself up very steep hills even in conditions of very poor traction. Plus, when it got to the top, the rope and grapnel could be retreived for re-use; just install a new rocket motor.
8th of 7, Jan 11 2013
  

       JAPU... Jet Assisted Pull-Up. Nice.
  

       Regarding ground clearance, a 1.5 inch thick, 2-3 ft square plate of sufficiently dense material ought to provide enough weight, and has the added benefit if doubling as a skid plate.
21 Quest, Jan 11 2013
  

       See link
  

       The centrifugal tire can be modified to have claws that only come out when under torque or when sufficient G-force is applied. They would make a great add on to your Idea. (which is awesome)
Brian the Painter, Jan 11 2013
  

       Ford's Model T had to be driven up steep hills in reverse because the fuel pickup was in the front of the fuel tank, not for any advantage of traction. Unless the tank was completely full or the hill not very steep, the engine became starved for fuel.
whlanteigne, Jan 12 2013
  
      
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