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Hooverculture

vacuum cleaner grow bags
  (+14, -1)(+14, -1)
(+14, -1)
  [vote for,
against]

Don't just dump your vacuum cleaner bags when you can use them as grow bags, as long as they are part of the Hooverculture range.

Hooverculture is the collective name for the new type of vacuum cleaner bags, each of which already contains a small amount of nutrient and some particular seed.

When the bags are filled, instead of just dumping them, you place them in a plant pot, cover them with a bit of soil and water them. The majority of domestic house dust is non-toxic and will break down perfectly well in time.

Choose a particular plant or shrub, or just take what you get as a surprise. Happy Hoovering.

xenzag, Jul 11 2010

[link]






       (+) But...
what about the Dyson?
  

       Mrs AWOL (an enthusiastic composter) puts the contents of the Dyson on the heap, along with the other compostable waste.
AbsintheWithoutLeave, Jul 11 2010
  

       Herb garden? Tomatoes? For these, there is no better fertilizer mixture than one made of dead bugs, dried skin, and fallen hairs.   

       This is disgusting, but [+] anyway.
swimswim, Jul 11 2010
  

       The other day, i decided to throw the sweepings in the living room on the compost heap instead of in the normal rubbish bin. I don't know if this was a good idea because i think as well as consisting a fair amount of biodegradable stuff along with stuff which is robust enough to provide some kind of root roughage, there would also be stuff which is somewhat water-soluble which would get assimilated into plants or other soil life and do something nasty to the people or other animals which ended up eating it. Having said that, i'm a long way from knowing that to be true.
nineteenthly, Jul 11 2010
  

       The Dyson should be *in* the heap.
RayfordSteele, Jul 11 2010
  

       Same kind of idea as: http://tinyurl.com/2v8e7w4   

       Seed-Embedded Packaging The Cardboard Life Box Will Grow a Tree When It's Chucked
Payo, Jul 13 2010
  

       <Nineteenthly>   

       I'd suggest that most life on this planet has spent the majority of the whole history of the world growing on the detritus of that which went before.   

       Mushrooms grow on pooh, but eating mushrooms doesn't give you diarrhea.
Twizz, Jul 13 2010
  

       well [Twizz] you may have put me off mushroom for a while.   

       I looked up household toxins which might get into plant root systems, and it is a complex subject in that certain plants are resistant, and certain chemicals are not adsorbed. etc.
dentworth, Jul 13 2010
  

       Yes, the thing is, certainly there is plenty of detritus from various sources, but it generally didn't come from sulphuric acid poured over fluorite or bits of broken mobile 'phone.   

       Hedge mustard does something nasty for a start. Other plants are dynamic accumulators. Apart from all that, water soluble stuff gets leached out after a while. Would it make sense for the hooverings to be stuck in a pressure cooker and boiled for a month or so?
nineteenthly, Jul 13 2010
  

       Mushrooms aren’t plants.
Ian Tindale, Jul 13 2010
  

       It's a nice idea and would love to give it a bun, but just can't think of growing lettuce with cat hair...
xandram, Jul 13 2010
  

       Well, the best vegetables are grown with manure.... eeew!
xenzag, Jul 13 2010
  

       + I voted for this. Seems like a good idea.   

       I'm kind of let down that there wasn't some hidden message about those who champion austerity in the middle of recessions- but I couldn't pull that off, either.
Zimmy, Jul 13 2010
  

       what [swimswim] said. Ewwwwwww, but +   

       Organic material is organic material. Wildflowers?
nomocrow, Jul 14 2010
  

       So organic material made in an industrial process is exactly the same as organic material made by nature's paths ? I would have thought doing things in bulk has an affect.
wjt, Jul 14 2010
  

       I hate it when dust puts on airs.
nomocrow, Jul 15 2010
  

       When you say organic, [nomocrow], are you referring to biological material or to material composed of complex molecules including chains or rings of carbon? Because the second is not the same, particularly if it's some kind of plastic or it includes elements not generally found in organisms in such molecules such as chlorine or fluorine. Whereas those are found as ions in many living things, they aren't often part of molecules as such and don't get processed in the same way. There are a few substances such as fimbrolide and some found in red algae, but those are in marine environments.   

       I also agree that bulk must make a difference because they would be hypertonic.   

       Furthermore, our compost heap is full of my hair.
nineteenthly, Jul 15 2010
  
      
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