Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Ice cream drill

No, it's not like a fire drill
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Small electric drill designed for kitchen use. Comes with one attachment that looks quite a bit like a hole driller (link). Use it to dig out a scoop of ice cream from that far-too-frozen container.

Can also be marketed as just the attachment, for use with hand-held blenders.

(update) It doesn't have to be sharp like the one in the link, or have a drill bit in the center. It can work through friction, and should be fairly safe to use.

Worldgineer, Feb 23 2005

Hole driller drill bit http://members.comm.../pic/1064394028.jpg
a bit for drilling holes using your drill [Worldgineer, Feb 23 2005]

Dewey, My Kitchen Drill Dewey_2c_20My_20Kitchen_20Drill
you're doing better than my almost-the-same-idea [FarmerJohn, Feb 24 2005]

An auger shell bit would do the trick. http://www.vanguard...17_Shell_augers.htm
this is the only picture I could find. [Knife Knut, Feb 24 2005]

Ice cream hole auger. http://www.wellspen...613495_1_52840.jpeg
[2 fries shy of a happy meal, Feb 24 2005]

[link]






       there is a polar bear, here. giving us both strange looks. :)
po, Feb 23 2005
  

       The drill didn't scare her/im away?
Worldgineer, Feb 23 2005
  

       Good one, [World]. It's my dream to one day have a freezer just for ice cream, so I can set the temperature so it won't make it too frozen.
Machiavelli, Feb 23 2005
  

       Next, we need cylindrical ice cream cones, of varying lengths (and bores).
Shz, Feb 23 2005
  

       Cylindrical ice cream cones with threads right? so you can screw the ice cream into the cone...forget it. That is just too silly.   

       Machiavelli: Why not have an ice cream zone in you freezer? A triple decker: cool, frozen, very frozen.
gootyam, Feb 23 2005
  

       [FJ], I guess you just didn't identify the consumer's needs. Making pasta with power tools? Maybe. Getting that damn ice cream out of the carton? Definately.   

       Though mine does lack a cute and catchy name.
Worldgineer, Feb 24 2005
  

       vanilla driller (killer)
po, Feb 25 2005
  

       A minature model Arctic survey team to put on top of your ice cream, complete with sleds, huskies, tents, warmly wrapped-up scientists, and fully functional core sample drilling equipment.
hippo, Feb 25 2005
  

       Sounds quite a bit like the cylindrical "scoop" used at the old Thrifty ice cream counters. No power drill needed for that one. I think it also had two rods that pushed in to the ice cream that helped to twist the plug free from where it was still attached.   

       How you planning to get the ice cream out of the hole saw? (Assuming you can actually detach the plug of ice cream where its still attached) The Thrify unit had a plate in the cylinder that pushed the plug of ice cream out when a handle was squeezed.   

       How about making your cylindrical cutting gizmo of waffle cone matter and just hand out the stuffed cone as the final product? (messy, unless the outside, coated with chocolate could be wiped/licked clean as necessary to prevent drippage).   

       A rotating auger inside a cylinder could bore itself in to the ice cream with a little pressure from the operator. The auger bit's design would help pull the plug from the container of ice cream. To eject the product from the cutting device, a reverse rotation mode forces a slotted plate (prevented from rotating) to thread its way toward the open end, pushing the ice cream with it.   

       For the consumer market, one could make a standardized dispensing device that worked like "Push Up" frozen treats. You mount your parallel walled rectangular or cylindrical tub o' frozen stuff in it. Push the button, it advances the contents out of the container, uses a wire (heated?) to slice off a chunk which you slide/spatula off to your plate/bowl. For cone use, the cylindrical packaging/dispenser would match the diameter of the cone. Think "caulking gun".   

       Cylindrical ice cream dispenser packs can be used in the manual dispensing gun by hand or by machine in your next refrigerator freezer. In addition to in-door ice and water, now there's a Rocky Road dispenser. Push a cone against the little stainless steel bar, and a perfect Thrifty style scoop is plopped on to the waiting cone.
half, Feb 25 2005
  

       Now that's what I call constructive input. Plus, a second reference to Thrifty ice cream counters in as many days (yum, chocolate malted crunch).   

       I had considered different ways of getting the ice cream out. The most simple design would be to just have a wide slot down the side of the cylinder. A spoon (or your finger) can push the ice cream back out. A second option would be to have two slots, but sticking out of either side is a small tab connected to an inner metal disk. This would be very similar to the Thrifty design, but instead you just push down on these tabs to push out the ice cream.   

       //Rocky Road dispenser// I love that. Though I guess a soft-serve style would be easier to maintain.
Worldgineer, Feb 25 2005
  

       Not really. Soft serve machines are a pain. This wouldn't be much more than a big cookie press. Come to think of it, it could dispense refrigerated cookie dough. Pop it in the mini-oven/cookie jar next to the fridge for a tasty fresh treat.   

       To give away my age, Thrifty ice cream was 5 cents/scoop at my earliest recollection. It's still available at "Water & Ice" type stores around here, but it's nothing like thriftily priced.
half, Feb 25 2005
  

       // Soft serve machines are a pain// I'll take your word for it. Post your ice cream dispenser idea - I'll certainly bun it.
Worldgineer, Feb 25 2005
  
      
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