Half a croissant, on a plate, with a sign in front of it saying '50c'
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Molecular Scrabble

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The game is played on an hexagonal grid board using tiles with a periodic element index fill-painted on one side. To begin, each player blindly chooses 7 tiles for their bouquet.

Turns consist of creating a new molecule or modifying an existing molecule, by adding or inserting tiles. Tiles already on the board may be moved or removed to accomodate the change.

Unlike word Scrabble, a new molecule can be started anywhere. Adjacent tiles in a molecule indicate an atomic bond (actual geometry is otherwise ignored).

At the end of a turn, all molecules on the board must be viable.

Scoring:
• +points: tiles played plus existing tiles in the molecule which haven't been moved;
• -points: removed tiles.
As in word Scrabble there are multiplier squares (err "hexes"), valid for the first covering by a tile.

The face value of the tiles is a rough reciprocal of the element's affinity to formation. (Noble gases have a higher value if they're in a molecule, rather than played in their monatomic state.)

At the end of a turn, the player takes enough tiles from the bag to bring his/her bouquet up to the minimum of 7 pieces. (Since tiles removed during play are put into the bouquet the player may already have 7 or more pieces)

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Variation: Entropic Scrabble - as above, but scoring is based on energy of formation.

FlyingToaster, Jan 16 2016

Sokobond http://www.sokobond.com/
Another Chemistry-themed puzzle game. [Cuit_au_Four, Jan 18 2016]

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       Perhaps one might attempt to form a chain, such as a polymer or polypeptide? Could have side chains, can add to any end of the chain.
Vernon, Jan 17 2016
  

       hmm... true, multiple repetitive elements probably shouldn't count towards the score, nor the main chain if a sidechain is being added to...   

       So, building methane from a previously laid carbon atom gets you points, as does making ethane from methane, but making propane only gets you ethane points, or maybe only added-tile points.   

       Similarly to word Scrabble where, just because a sequence of letters is pronounceable doesn't mean it's a recognized word, all molecules must be referenced in a chemistry handbook. (Or, perhaps, undocumented yet viable molecules don't receive scoring)
FlyingToaster, Jan 17 2016
  

       I like it +1   

       And it turned out to be more novel than my periodic table dartboard...if it wasn't for those pesky kids...
not_morrison_rm, Jan 18 2016
  

       Well, your dartboard could be used in conjuction with the Scrabble board: the player throws darts to see which elements he/she gets.
FlyingToaster, Jan 18 2016
  

       You could also play this like regular scrabble, except that:   

       (1) Element names instead of letters
(2) Tiles for subscripts 1, 2 etc
(3) Open and close bracket tiles
(4) All compounds (including those created by intersection) must be viable and written in standard notation.
MaxwellBuchanan, Jan 18 2016
  

       Would an organic chemistry edition be viable?
Ling, Jan 18 2016
  

       I think there's certainly enough room to play with a benzene ring.
FlyingToaster, Jan 18 2016
  
      
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